Academics & Research

Research

Innovative, Basic, & Clinical Research

In addition to education, and the multitude of avenues and services that University of Utah Health provides, our faculty and staff conduct, collaborate, and initiate research. We advance knowledge through innovative, basic, and clinical research and translate our discoveries into applications that help people.

The University of Utah is ranked among the top 30 public research universities in the nation with particular distinctions in medicine and genetics. As a result of our benchmarking research, the university received over $309 million in research and student aid funding from external sources and ranks 15th in the nation for significant awards to faculty for research efforts.

Research in the health sciences spans many fields of study. From genetics, to molecular biology – from biomedical engineering to drug and pharmaceutical research; University of Utah researchers are on the leading edge of the development and enhancement of knowledge in the medical and health sciences.

Research News

 Huntsman Cancer Institute Names Cornelia Ulrich as Director of its Cancer Research Center
Clinical, Research, Education, Health Care Transformation
Jul 13, 2018

Huntsman Cancer Institute Names Cornelia Ulrich as Director of its Cancer Research Center

Huntsman Cancer Institute, cancer, cancer research, u0991242

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah today announced the appointment of Cornelia Ulrich, PhD, MS, as director of its National Cancer Institute-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center. She will oversee HCI’s academic consortium of nearly 200 cancer research teams. Ulrich will lead efforts to advance HCI’s research in laboratory, clinical and population science, with the goal of improving cancer prevention and treatment. – Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah today announced the appointment of Cornelia Ulrich, PhD, MS, as director of its National Cancer Institute-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center. She will oversee HCI’s academic consortium of nearly 200 cancer research teams. Ulrich will lead efforts to advance HCI’s research in laboratory, clinical and population science, with the goal of improving cancer prevention and treatment. ... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute Researcher Receives Leadership Award from the National Cancer Institute
Education, Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation
Jul 11, 2018

Huntsman Cancer Institute Researcher Receives Leadership Award from the National Cancer Institute

Huntsman Cancer Institute, cancer, cancer research,

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) physician-scientist Ahmad Halwani, MD, has been selected by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to receive a Cancer Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Award. This award recognizes physician-scientists for their contributions to clinical cancer research. It also provides financial support for ongoing research and leadership development to enable recipients to further advance their clinical research careers.... Read More

New Surgical Realities
Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation, Education,
Jul 03, 2018

New Surgical Realities

Nathan Adams is one of six faculty members to be awarded the inaugural Jon M. Huntsman Presidential Chair.... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute Partners with Nation’s Top Cancer Centers to Endorse Goal of Eliminating HPV Related Cancers in the United States
Research, Education, Health Care Transformation, Clinical
Jun 07, 2018

Huntsman Cancer Institute Partners with Nation’s Top Cancer Centers to Endorse Goal of Eliminating HPV Related Cancers in the United States

Huntsman Cancer Institute, hpv, cancer, cancer research,

Nearly 80 million Americans — one out of every four people — are infected with human papillomavirus (HPV). And of those millions, more than 31,000 will be diagnosed with an HPV-related cancer this year. Despite those staggering figures and the availability of a vaccine to prevent the infections that cause these cancers, HPV vaccination remains low in the United States. ... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute and TGen receive $6.7 million grant to battle a hidden enemy
Education, Research, Health Care Transformation, Clinical
May 30, 2018

Huntsman Cancer Institute and TGen receive $6.7 million grant to battle a hidden enemy

Huntsman Cancer Institute, breast cancer, cancer research

Often what kills cancer patients is not the cancer at its original or primary site, but its spread to secondary sites within the body, through a process called metastasis. In the case of breast cancer, the tumor often spreads to the bone, and it is this bone metastasis that results in intense pain and precedes spread to other organs.... Read More

University of Utah Health Announces Fred W. & Christine A. Fairclough Endowed Chair in Neurology
Research, Education, Recognition
May 23, 2018

University of Utah Health Announces Fred W. & Christine A. Fairclough Endowed Chair in Neurology

Clinical Neurosciences Center, ,

University of Utah Health announced a gift of $1.25 million to create the Fred W. and Christine A. Fairclough Endowed Chair in the Department of Neurology. Kevin C. (KC) Brennan, MD, has been named as the first recipient. Dr. Brennan is a clinician scientist who specializes in the treatment of headache disorders, in particular migraine and post-traumatic headaches.... Read More

Neurology
Huntsman Cancer Institute First Adult Cancer Hospital in Mountain West to Offer CAR T Cell Therapy to Patients
Health Care Transformation, Research, Education, Clinical
May 10, 2018

Huntsman Cancer Institute First Adult Cancer Hospital in Mountain West to Offer CAR T Cell Therapy to Patients

Huntsman Cancer Institute, blood and marrow transplant, cancer care, cancer research, immunotherapy, leukemia, lymphoma

Huntsman Cancer Institute announced today that it has been certified to offer both chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The therapies are approved for types of aggressive blood cancers, including B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. HCI is one of a few locations nationwide, and the only in the Mountain West, approved to offer these new therapies to adult cancer patients.... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute Opens Center for HOPE and is Awarded $9.7 Million to Improve Health Among Underserved Populations
Education, Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Research
May 08, 2018

Huntsman Cancer Institute Opens Center for HOPE and is Awarded $9.7 Million to Improve Health Among Underserved Populations

Huntsman Cancer Institute, cancer research, center for hope, health equity

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) today announced the opening of the Cancer Population Sciences and Huntsman Center for Health Outcomes and Population Equity (HOPE), a new research and clinical space dedicated to preventing cancer and improving health among underserved populations and improving outcomes in cancer patients. The center recently received $9.7 million from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to fund a clinical trial researching new and effective approaches to reduce tobacco use.... Read More

Persistence Pays Off in Discovery That Could Lead to Improved Treatment and Survivability of Patients with Brain Tumors
Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation, Education
May 01, 2018

Persistence Pays Off in Discovery That Could Lead to Improved Treatment and Survivability of Patients with Brain Tumors

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Gliomas are the most common type of central nervous system cancer but how these tumors develop is not fully understood. Sheri Holmen, PhD a researcher at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) and professor of surgery at the University of Utah just published the results of her research on gliomas in Cell Reports. The work is focused on a mutated gene that is a critical piece of the puzzle for glioma development, according to Holmen’s work.... Read More

2018 Bench-to-Bedside Awards Grand Prize to Real-time Fertility Device
Research, Recognition, Clinical, Education
Apr 19, 2018

2018 Bench-to-Bedside Awards Grand Prize to Real-time Fertility Device

Utah Center for Reproductive Medicine, , bench to bedside, medical device

A team of students from University of Utah Health set out to help mitigate these frustrations with a medical device they presented at the 2018 annual Bench-to-Bedside competition. Their team, PreOv, received the $50,000 grand prize for its low-cost, user-friendly device that accurately provides couples with real-time fertility information. ... Read More

Mind the Gap: Increasing Diversity in Research Will Open Doors for Precision Medicine
Research
Mar 30, 2018

Mind the Gap: Increasing Diversity in Research Will Open Doors for Precision Medicine

Science is known for its rigor. Exemplary experiments are systematic and controlled, and, in fields such as medicine, examining large populations is key. Meticulous science has translated into medical advances that are coming at a furious pace. But when it comes to serving minority populations, research has missed the mark. Health disparities have developed, and the risks of this gross oversight have become all too apparent.... Read More

When it comes to CRISPR, patients need a seat at the table
Research
Mar 26, 2018

When it comes to CRISPR, patients need a seat at the table

Imagine that you are diagnosed with a fatal disease caused by a defect in a single gene. If technology existed that could "edit" the error and cure the disease, would you use it? Would you edit a gene that caused a significant disability, such as blindness? What about for a genetic trait that increases your risk of obesity or alcoholism? Would your decisions change if it were your child’s genome? ... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute Joins National Clinical Trial Targeting AML
Health Care Transformation, Education, Research, Clinical
Mar 15, 2018

Huntsman Cancer Institute Joins National Clinical Trial Targeting AML

Huntsman Cancer Institute, u0029004, u0866101, u0690004

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) has been selected to participate in the Beat AML Master Trial, an innovative clinical trial sponsored by The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS). The clinical trial is testing several new targeted therapies for the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). HCI is the only facility in the Mountain West offering this trial to AML patients. ... Read More

Surprising Discovery Provides Insights into Aggressive Endometrial Cancers
Research, Education, Clinical, Health Care Transformation
Mar 13, 2018

Surprising Discovery Provides Insights into Aggressive Endometrial Cancers

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

New research from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) indicates steroid and hormone receptors are simultaneously active in many endometrial cancer tissues. The findings, published today in the journal Cell Reports, yield insights about factors that contribute to more aggressive endometrial tumors. ... Read More

Working in Harmony: New Insights into How Packages of DNA Orchestrate Development
Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Education, Research
Feb 15, 2018

Working in Harmony: New Insights into How Packages of DNA Orchestrate Development

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

New research from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) illuminates aspects of how an early embryo, the product of fertilization of a female egg cell by a male sperm cell, can give rise to all the many cell types of the adult animal. The findings, published today in the journal Cell, have significant implications for understanding how early development is orchestrated, and provides a mechanism for how parental environment might impact the expression of these genes in the offspring.... Read More

Changes in genes involved in DNA repair and packaging linked to risk of multiple myeloma
Education, Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation
Feb 01, 2018

Changes in genes involved in DNA repair and packaging linked to risk of multiple myeloma

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Researchers have identified two gene regions that contribute to multiple myeloma, an inherited cancer that occurs in bone marrow, through a new method that makes use of human disease pedigrees. Nicola Camp and Rosalie Waller of Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah and colleagues report their findings February 1st in PLOS Genetics. ... Read More

Educating for Research Reproducibility
Education, Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Research
Jan 31, 2018

Educating for Research Reproducibility

The Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library is gaining a national reputation for its reproducibility education programs. ... Read More

Clinical, Research
Jan 31, 2018

All Utah Newborns Now Tested for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

Clinical Neurosciences Center, ,

As of January 29, 2018 every infant born in Utah will be screened for Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). The Utah Department of Health (UDOH) Newborn Screening Program tests blood samples from approximately 52,000 newborns every year and identifies nearly 400 infants who suffer from more than 40 different disorders. Utah and Massachusetts are the first states to begin screening for SMA.... Read More

Select...
2017 Year-End Recap
Education, Research, Clinical, Health Care Transformation
Jan 16, 2018

2017 Year-End Recap

The achievements and challenges of this past year are a reminder of what we stand for as the only academic medical center in the Mountain West. ... Read More

Wasatch Front Inversions Could Cause More Than 200 Cases of Pneumonia Each Year
Research
Jan 09, 2018

Wasatch Front Inversions Could Cause More Than 200 Cases of Pneumonia Each Year

pneumonia

Air pollution trapped along the Wasatch Front by winter inversions are estimated to send more than 200 people to the emergency room with pneumonia each year, according to a study by University of Utah Health and Intermountain Healthcare. Bad air quality especially erodes the health of adults over age 65, a population particularly vulnerable to the effects of pneumonia. ... Read More

Select...
New Cancer Treatment Technology Coming to Utah
Research, Clinical, Education, Health Care Transformation
Dec 21, 2017

New Cancer Treatment Technology Coming to Utah

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

A new cancer treatment technology is one step closer to Salt Lake City. Today Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) announced a plan to add a proton therapy center to its Cancer Hospital. The center will be the only one of its kind in the region. The plan will now move forward to the next steps of approval, design and vendor selection. ... Read More

Meet the Tiny Machine in Cells that Massacres Viruses
Research
Dec 21, 2017

Meet the Tiny Machine in Cells that Massacres Viruses

Scientists at University of Utah Health have determined the structure a tiny cellular machine that chops the viruses’ genetic material into bits. Their research shows how the machine detects the intruders and processes them for destruction to protect cells and prevent the spread of infection. ... Read More

Biochemistry
First-of-its-Kind Survey Reveals Significant Disconnects in How Three Key Stakeholders—Patients, Physicians, Employers—Perceive the Health Care Experience
Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Research
Nov 29, 2017

First-of-its-Kind Survey Reveals Significant Disconnects in How Three Key Stakeholders—Patients, Physicians, Employers—Perceive the Health Care Experience

Quality, ,

University of Utah Health today announced results of the Value in Health Care Survey, a landmark study that examines the viewpoints of patients, physicians and employers—three stakeholder groups that directly receive, provide, and pay for health care. The study explores how these groups perceive value and prioritize its components of quality, service and cost. ... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute Researchers Trace Timeline of Tumor Evolution in Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients
Education, Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation
Nov 27, 2017

Huntsman Cancer Institute Researchers Trace Timeline of Tumor Evolution in Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

A new study by researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah observed how breast cancer tumors evolve over time and demonstrated how changes within tumors may contribute to the process by which cancers no longer respond to treatment. Further, the research identifies that some of these changes may be shared across certain treatment-resistant breast cancers. The study was published this month in Nature Communications. ... Read More

Risk for Aging-related Diseases Elevated Among Thyroid Cancer Survivors
Research, Health Care Transformation, Education, Clinical
Nov 22, 2017

Risk for Aging-related Diseases Elevated Among Thyroid Cancer Survivors

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Risk for aging-related diseases such as heart disease and diabetes was significantly higher among thyroid cancer survivors in Utah than it was among age-matched, cancer-free individuals, with those diagnosed before age 40 having the highest risk for some of the diseases, according to results published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute Expanding Access to Clinical Trials
Education, Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation
Nov 14, 2017

Huntsman Cancer Institute Expanding Access to Clinical Trials

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

All cancer treatments and medications that are used today, at one point, were clinical trials. Clinical trials can offer hope, particularly in a complex disease like cancer. But getting access to clinical trials can be difficult, especially if patients have to travel a long distance to a hospital that offers trials. ... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute Study Identifies Enhanced Impact of Treatment  for Hereditary Cancer Patients
Health Care Transformation, Research, Clinical, Education
Nov 06, 2017

Huntsman Cancer Institute Study Identifies Enhanced Impact of Treatment for Hereditary Cancer Patients

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

People with an inherited syndrome called familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) have a 100% lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer if they do not seek appropriate medical care. Recent findings published by researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah identified a promising prevention treatment for patients with FAP. ... Read More

University of Utah Receives $47.5 Million Gift from Craig H. Neilsen Foundation for New State-of-the-Art Rehabilitation Hospital
Research, Recognition, Health Care Transformation, Clinical
Nov 01, 2017

University of Utah Receives $47.5 Million Gift from Craig H. Neilsen Foundation for New State-of-the-Art Rehabilitation Hospital

Rehabilitation Center, Rehabilitation, ,

The University of Utah today announced that the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation will donate $47.5 million for a new, state-of-the-art rehabilitation hospital as part of the redevelopment and modernization of the university’s health sciences campus. The 75-bed hospital, to be named the Craig H. Neilsen Rehabilitation Hospital, will be one of the most advanced rehabilitation facilities in the nation and will serve as a catalyst for the further development of the university’s rehabilitation programs.... Read More

Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Additions to healing garden at Huntsman Cancer Institute promote healing, peace of mind
Health Care Transformation, Education, Research, Clinical
Oct 26, 2017

Additions to healing garden at Huntsman Cancer Institute promote healing, peace of mind

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

When she was first diagnosed with ovarian cancer, Dr. Jan Byrne didn't know of any survivors of the disease. "It's a devastating disease — a silent killer," she said. "A lot of people don't make it." Byrne's cancer was found in the early stages, however, and after six months of chemotherapy and three major surgeries at Huntsman Cancer Institute, she survived. It's been six years.... Read More

New Study Finds Childhood Cancer Survivors Commonly Stay at Jobs  to Keep Health Insurance
Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation, Education
Oct 19, 2017

New Study Finds Childhood Cancer Survivors Commonly Stay at Jobs to Keep Health Insurance

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

The results of a national cancer survey find a significant number of childhood cancer survivors are worried about keeping their health insurance, to the point of letting it affect their career decisions. The findings were published today in JAMA Oncology. Anne Kirchhoff, PhD, investigator at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah and assistant professor of pediatrics, led the study. Her goal was to examine the prevalence of job lock in full-time, employed childhood cancer survivors. Job lock is when an employee stays at a job in order to keep work-related health insurance. ... Read More

David Turok awarded a five-year Mid-Career Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research
Research, Education, Clinical, Recognition
Oct 13, 2017

David Turok awarded a five-year Mid-Career Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research

Select..., Womens Health, , awards

David Turok MD MPH, Associate Professor and Family Planning Division Director in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology has been awarded a five-year Mid-Career Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research (K24) from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). ... Read More

Obstetrics and Gynecology,Select...
New Research on Sperm Stem Cells has Implications for Male Infertility and Cancer
Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation, Education
Oct 05, 2017

New Research on Sperm Stem Cells has Implications for Male Infertility and Cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

New research from scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah and collaborators at University of Utah Health (U of U Health) sheds light on the complex process that occurs in the development of human sperm stem cells. This is the first study to characterize the changes human sperm stem cells undergo as they mature. The results have implications for understanding male infertility as well as cancer development and were published today in the journal Cell Stem Cell. ... Read More

Two Studies Support Intensive Blood Pressure Control for Long-term Health, Quality of Life
Research
Aug 23, 2017

Two Studies Support Intensive Blood Pressure Control for Long-term Health, Quality of Life

Internal Medicine, , blood pressure, hypertension, geriatrics

Two studies provide additional support for lowering systolic blood pressure to an intensive goal of 120 mmHg – far below the standard guidelines of 140 mmHg – to reduce the risk of heart disease in high-risk patients with hypertension. The new research shows that intensive blood pressure control is well-tolerated by patients and is cost-effective in terms of health-related quality of life and financial costs to the healthcare system.... Read More

Population Health Sciences
Taking Value to School
Health Care Transformation, Research, Clinical, Education
Aug 11, 2017

Taking Value to School

Value is king at University of Utah Health. More than a decade ago, visionary leaders lunged for the brass ring of value, and they haven’t let go. This effort goes beyond the clinical enterprise. ... Read More

Reversing a Genetic Mutation to Restore Smiles
Research
Aug 09, 2017

Reversing a Genetic Mutation to Restore Smiles

nih

Rena D’Souza, D.D.S., Ph.D., Professor of Dentistry at the University of Utah Health received a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to build on her past research to characterize the genetics that prevent tooth formation and develop therapies to reverse this process. ... Read More

U.S. News and World Report Names University Of Utah Hospital Top In Utah; List Also Includes High National Rankings For Huntsman Cancer Institute & ENT Specialty
Research, Clinical, Recognition
Aug 08, 2017

U.S. News and World Report Names University Of Utah Hospital Top In Utah; List Also Includes High National Rankings For Huntsman Cancer Institute & ENT Specialty

Huntsman Cancer Institute, ENT, ,

U.S. News & World Report has released its 2017-2018 Best Hospital Rankings. For the fourth consecutive year, University of Utah Hospital was ranked No. 1 in Utah and in the Salt Lake City metro area. University of Utah’s Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) was also ranked number 38 in the country for cancer care, while the university’s Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT) specialty was ranked 18th nationwide.... Read More

Neurosurgery,Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences,Internal Medicine,Neurology
Scientists Restore Youthful Plasticity to the Brains of Adult Mice
Research
Aug 07, 2017

Scientists Restore Youthful Plasticity to the Brains of Adult Mice

Like the rest of the body, the brain loses flexibility with age, impacting the ability to learn, remember, and adapt. Now, scientists at University of Utah Health report they can rejuvenate the plasticity of the mouse brain, specifically in the visual cortex. Published today in PNAS, the study shows that manipulating a single gene triggers the shift, revealing it as a target for new treatments to recover the brain’s youthful potential. ... Read More

Neurobiology and Anatomy
New Technology Yields Better Images of Patient Tumors
Research, Clinical, Health Care Transformation
Jul 28, 2017

New Technology Yields Better Images of Patient Tumors

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah is the first cancer center in the United States to use a new, state-of-the-art CT scanner that allows doctors to view higher quality, personalized images of a patient’s tumor. The scanner, called the Somatom Confidence 64 from Siemens, boasts numerous features that create more detailed images, giving physicians the ability to direct their therapy precisely where it’s needed.... Read More

Researchers Propose New Approach to Identify Genetic Mutations in Men with Prostate Cancer
Research
Jun 28, 2017

Researchers Propose New Approach to Identify Genetic Mutations in Men with Prostate Cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute, , cancer, prostate cancer, heredity, genetics

Scientists have had limited success at identifying specific inherited genes associated with prostate cancer. Researchers studied prostate cancer patients with multiple cancer diagnoses, many who would not be recommended for genetic tests following current guidelines, to identify genetic mutations that may influence cancer risk. ... Read More

Human Genetics
Study Highlights Role of Rare Genetic Mutations in ALS
Research
Jun 22, 2017

Study Highlights Role of Rare Genetic Mutations in ALS

Clinical Neurosciences Center, , als, lou gehrig's disease

90 to 95 percent of ALS cases are “sporadic”, meaning these patients had no clear family history of the condition, and therefore no indication that they were at risk. A new study by investigators at University of Utah health shows that approximately one-fifth of these cases do have signs of a genetic predisposition toward the disease: these patients carry detrimental mutations associated with the familial form of ALS.... Read More

Neurology
From DNA to Decision-making: University of Utah Health Awarded $4 Million Toward a Comprehensive Look at Heart Birth Defects
Recognition, Research
Jun 22, 2017

From DNA to Decision-making: University of Utah Health Awarded $4 Million Toward a Comprehensive Look at Heart Birth Defects

ob/gyn research, heart disease

The American Heart Association (AHA) awarded investigators at University of Utah Health $3.7 million to conduct collaborative research to prevent and treat congenital heart disease. U of U Health is one of four groups across the country to join the AHA’s Strategically Focused Research Network (SFRN) for children.... Read More

Neurobiology and Anatomy,Population Health Sciences,Human Genetics,Obstetrics and Gynecology
Utah Billionaire Jon Huntsman Opens New Children's Cancer Research Center
Clinical, Education, Health Care Transformation, Research
Jun 22, 2017

Utah Billionaire Jon Huntsman Opens New Children's Cancer Research Center

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Chemicals billionaire Jon Huntsman Sr. is one of the world’s great optimists. His mom died of cancer in her 50s, and he’s battled four different forms of the disease. His response was to launch the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah in the 1990s. His audacious goal: to eradicate the most challenging forms of cancer in one generation. Then, says his son, Peter Huntsman, only half joking, with cancer research beat, he hopes they’ll be able to turn the cancer institute into a hotel.... Read More

Yarraman Flu or Horse Flu? Words & Graphics Influence Willingness to Vaccinate
Research
Jun 21, 2017

Yarraman Flu or Horse Flu? Words & Graphics Influence Willingness to Vaccinate

vaccine

“Yarraman flu is a virus quickly infecting the U.S. .…” The mock announcement was enough to make readers worry. But when the name of the hypothetical illness was changed to “horse flu”, readers reported being less motivated to get a vaccine that would prevent them from contracting the illness. The research was published as two studies in Vaccine and Emerging Infectious Diseases. ... Read More

Population Health Sciences
Research, Recognition
May 30, 2017

Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah Selected to Join National Cancer Institute’s Systems Biology Consortium

hci, university of utah health, pharmacy, award

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) and the College of Pharmacy at University of Utah Health (U of U Health) have been awarded a $9.1 million, five-year grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to serve as a Research Center in NCI’s Cancer Systems Biology Consortium (CSBC). HCI is one of nine research institutions nationwide to be selected as a Research Center in the CSBC. ... Read More

 Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah Selected to Join National Cancer Institute’s Systems Biology Consortium
Clinical, Research, Education, Health Care Transformation
May 30, 2017

Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah Selected to Join National Cancer Institute’s Systems Biology Consortium

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

SALT LAKE CITY – Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) and the College of Pharmacy at the University of Utah (U of U) have been awarded a $9.1 million, five-year grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to serve as a Research Center in NCI’s Cancer Systems Biology Consortium (CSBC). HCI is one of nine research institutions nationwide to be selected as a Research Center in the CSBC. ... Read More

CEO of Huntsman Cancer Institute Inducted Alongside President Obama  to American Philosophical Society
Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Research, Education
May 22, 2017

CEO of Huntsman Cancer Institute Inducted Alongside President Obama to American Philosophical Society

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

SALT LAKE CITY – Mary Beckerle, PhD, CEO and Director of Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah, has been elected to highly distinguished membership in the American Philosophical Society (APS), joining a group of 32 inductees that includes former United States president Barack Obama. ... Read More

 Carson Tahoe Health Opens New Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Care Clinic
Research, Health Care Transformation, Education, Clinical
May 15, 2017

Carson Tahoe Health Opens New Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Care Clinic

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Carson City, Nev. – Today, May 15, Carson Tahoe Cancer Center opened a new blood and bone marrow transplant care clinic with support from the Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah. Under the collaboration, a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) physician and nurse from HCI will travel to Carson City once a month to treat patients both before and after they receive a transplant. ... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute and Intermountain Healthcare Launch Joint  Cancer Care Program for Adolescents and Young Adults
Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Research, Education
May 01, 2017

Huntsman Cancer Institute and Intermountain Healthcare Launch Joint Cancer Care Program for Adolescents and Young Adults

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah and Intermountain Cancer Centers announce a new collaboration today designed to meet the needs of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) between the ages of 15 and 39 who have been diagnosed with cancer. Each year over 1,000 adolescents and young adults in Utah are diagnosed with cancer, yet research has shown a number of gaps in their care. ... Read More

Cognitive Stimulation, Social Interactions & Physical Activity Increase Lifespan in Mice with Colon Cancer
Clinical, Education, Research, Health Care Transformation
Apr 25, 2017

Cognitive Stimulation, Social Interactions & Physical Activity Increase Lifespan in Mice with Colon Cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Living in a stimulating environment has a wide range of health benefits in humans and has even been shown to fight cancer in mice, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. A study published April 25 in Cell Reports reveals that cognitive stimulation, social interactions, and physical activity increase lifespan in mice with colon cancer by triggering the body's wound repair response.... Read More

Science Fiction Horror Wriggles into Reality with Discovery of Giant Sulfur-powered Shipworm
Research
Apr 17, 2017

Science Fiction Horror Wriggles into Reality with Discovery of Giant Sulfur-powered Shipworm

shipworm, chemosynthesis

Our world seems to grow smaller by the day as biodiversity rapidly dwindles, but Mother Earth still has a surprise or two up her sleeve. An international team of researchers were the first to investigate a never before studied species—a giant, black, mud dwelling, worm-like animal. The odd animal doesn’t seem to eat much, instead it gets its energy from a form of sulfur. ... Read More

Select...
Treatment Reverses Signs of Two Degenerative Brain Diseases, ALS & Ataxia, in Mice
Research
Apr 12, 2017

Treatment Reverses Signs of Two Degenerative Brain Diseases, ALS & Ataxia, in Mice

Clinical Neurosciences Center, , als, ataxia

Scientists report a significant step toward combatting two degenerative brain diseases that chip away at an individual’s ability to move, and think. A targeted therapy developed by scientists at University of Utah Health slows the progression of a condition in mice that mimics a rare disease called ataxia. In a parallel collaborative study, led by researchers at Stanford University, a nearly identical treatment improves the health of mice that model Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), commonly called Lou Gehrig’s disease. ... Read More

Neurology
Huntsman Cancer Institute Investigators Elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Education, Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation
Apr 12, 2017

Huntsman Cancer Institute Investigators Elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

University of Utah professors Bradley R. Cairns, professor and chair of Oncological Sciences and senior director of Basic Science at Huntsman Cancer Institute; Dana Carroll, distinguished professor of Biochemistry and HCI investigator; and Christopher D. Hacon, distinguished professor of Mathematics, were raised to a high honor in science today with their election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.... Read More

Recognition, Research
Apr 12, 2017

Three University of Utah Professors Elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

award, american academy of arts and sciences

University of Utah professors Bradley R. Cairns, Ph.D., professor and chair of Oncological Sciences and senior director of Basic Science at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI); Dana Carroll, Ph.D., distinguished professor of Biochemistry; and Christopher D. Hacon, Ph.D., distinguished professor of Mathematics, were raised to a high honor in science today with their election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.... Read More

Oncological Sciences,Biochemistry,Select...
Huntsman Cancer Institute Researchers Share Expertise at National Cancer Meeting
Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Research, Education
Apr 11, 2017

Huntsman Cancer Institute Researchers Share Expertise at National Cancer Meeting

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

More than 20 researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah made their mark on the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting this year. Held in Washington, D.C., the convention drew more than 21,500 cancer researchers from all over the world. Scientists attended sessions on topics from immunotherapy to precision medicine. About 15 researchers from HCI presented posters in the main conference hall, on a wide range of topics. ... Read More

Pushing New Frontiers: U Awarded $2.5 Million to Visualize Life's Building Blocks
Recognition, Research
Apr 04, 2017

Pushing New Frontiers: U Awarded $2.5 Million to Visualize Life's Building Blocks

The University of Utah is one of just five institutions in the world to be awarded a $2.5 million grant to purchase a state of the art cryo-electron microscope (cryo-EM), the Beckman Foundation announced today. The microscope, which will be able to visualize the structure of proteins and DNA at an atom-by-atom scale, will be installed in the Crocker Science Center, currently under construction on Presidents Circle. The microscope’s resolution is fine enough to see details such as the double-helix and ladder structure of DNA, said biochemistry professor Wesley Sundquist.... Read More

Biochemistry
Common Yeast May Worsen IBD Symptoms in Crohn’s Disease
Research
Mar 08, 2017

Common Yeast May Worsen IBD Symptoms in Crohn’s Disease

ibd, crohns disease, yeast

During the past decade, the gut has experienced a renaissance as investigations focus on the role of the microbiome on human health. While most studies have focused on bacteria, the dominant microbial inhabitants in the gut, scientists at University of Utah Health Sciences used mouse studies to show the role of yeast in aggravating the symptoms of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Their work suggests that allopurinol, a generic drug already on the market, could offer some relief. ... Read More

Pathology
Huntsman Cancer Institute Partners with National Cancer Institute on National Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Education Initiative
Clinical, Education, Research, Health Care Transformation
Mar 08, 2017

Huntsman Cancer Institute Partners with National Cancer Institute on National Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Education Initiative

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah is partnering with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to implement a nationwide colorectal cancer outreach and education initiative in support of increasing colorectal cancer screening rates in rural, frontier, and culturally diverse communities in Utah. The Screen to Save Initiative will launch in March at HCI and 48 other cancer centers around the nation, targeting average risk adults age 50 and older. ... Read More

Leaving a Research Legacy: Dean Y. Li Departing the U
Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Education, Research
Mar 07, 2017

Leaving a Research Legacy: Dean Y. Li Departing the U

As Dr. Dean Li's career takes an exciting new trajectory with Merck & Co., we celebrate his 23-year legacy of innovation and leadership that will propel the University of Utah forward for years to come. ... Read More

Research
Feb 28, 2017

Relief at Their Fingertips: Phone Monitoring Program Reduces Suffering of Chemotherapy Patients

cancer, pain, chemotherapy

Patients undergoing chemotherapy often experience difficult but treatable symptoms – including fatigue, pain, and nausea - in between healthcare appointments. But because providers are often not aware of them, some patients undergo unnecessary suffering. A new study by investigators at Huntsman Cancer Institute and the College of Nursing at the University of Utah shows that relief could be just a phone call away.... Read More

Select...,Oncological Sciences
Playing Favorites: Brain Cells Prefer One Parent’s Gene Over the Other’s
Research
Feb 23, 2017

Playing Favorites: Brain Cells Prefer One Parent’s Gene Over the Other’s

genetics, epigenetics, brain

It has long been thought that each copy of our DNA instructions - one inherited from mom and one from dad - is treated the same. A new study from scientists at the University of Utah School of Medicine shows that it is not uncommon for cells in the brain to preferentially activate one copy over the other. The finding breaks basic tenants of classic genetics and suggests new ways in which genetic mutations might cause brain disorders. ... Read More

Neurobiology and Anatomy
Intensive Blood Pressure Control Could Prevent 100,000 Deaths Each Year
Research
Feb 13, 2017

Intensive Blood Pressure Control Could Prevent 100,000 Deaths Each Year

blood pressure, hypertension

Researchers have projected that aggressively lowering blood pressure could help prevent more than 100,000 deaths in the U.S. each year. Experts from the University of Utah and institutions across the country built upon the landmark Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial which found that decreasing blood pressure to 120 mmHg compared to 140 mmHg reduced heart attack, stroke and death in people that were at high risk. Until now, the number of lives that could be saved was unknown.... Read More

Population Health Sciences
Genomes in Flux: New Study Reveals Hidden Dynamics of Bird & Mammal DNA Evolution
Research
Feb 06, 2017

Genomes in Flux: New Study Reveals Hidden Dynamics of Bird & Mammal DNA Evolution

genome, evolution

Evolution is often thought of as a gradual remodeling of the genome, the genetic blueprints for building an organism. But in some instances it might be more appropriate to call it an overhaul. Over the past 100 million years, the human lineage has lost one-fifth of its DNA, while an even greater amount was added, report scientists at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Until now, the extent to which our genome has expanded and contracted had been underappreciated. ... Read More

Human Genetics
Routinely Prescribed Antibiotic May Not Be Best for Treating Severe C. diff Infections
Research
Feb 06, 2017

Routinely Prescribed Antibiotic May Not Be Best for Treating Severe C. diff Infections

cdiff, hospital-acquired infection

Over the past two decades there has been a sharp rise in the number and severity of infections caused by the bacteria Clostridium difficile often shortened to C. diff now the most common hospital acquired infection in the United States. But a new study suggests that the most routinely prescribed antibiotic is not the best treatment for severe cases. Scientists at the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System and University of Utah report that patients with a severe C. diff infection (CDI) were less likely to die when treated with the antibiotic vancomycin compared to the standard treatment of metronidazole. ... Read More

Internal Medicine
Actors Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen Visit Huntsman Cancer Institute Patients and Staff
Research, Health Care Transformation, Education, Clinical
Jan 30, 2017

Actors Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen Visit Huntsman Cancer Institute Patients and Staff

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Actors Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen spent two hours visiting patients at Huntsman Cancer Institute on Sunday, January 22. The “Avengers: Age of Ultron” and “Captain America: Civil War” co-stars were in town promoting their Sundance film “Wind River.” Before flying back to Los Angeles, they took time to stop by the hospital and talk with cancer patients and staff.... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute Scientists Identify Bone Degradation Process Within Metastatic Breast Cancer
Education, Health Care Transformation, Research, Clinical
Jan 25, 2017

Huntsman Cancer Institute Scientists Identify Bone Degradation Process Within Metastatic Breast Cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Once breast cancer spreads through the body, it can degrade a patient’s healthy bones, causing numerous problems. Scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah have identified a new way that bones get destroyed through cancer. And they’ve also learned how to block that destruction with a new drug. Initial tests with patients show promising results.... Read More

Research
Jan 25, 2017

Huntsman Cancer Institute Scientists Identify Bone Degradation Process Within Metastatic Breast Cancer

surgery

Once breast cancer spreads through the body, it can degrade a patient’s healthy bones, causing numerous problems. Scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah have identified a new way that bones get destroyed through cancer. And they’ve also learned how to block that destruction with a new drug. Initial tests with patients show promising results.... Read More

Oncological Sciences
Biomarker Could Identify Patients With Potential to Recover From Advanced Heart Failure
Research
Jan 17, 2017

Biomarker Could Identify Patients With Potential to Recover From Advanced Heart Failure

Diabetes, Cardiovascular Center, , heart recovery, heart disease, diabetes

Investigators at the University of Utah have identified distinct differences in the hearts of advanced heart failure patients who have defied the odds and showed signs of recovery from the disease. Published online in the journal Circulation, the new findings could help clinicians identify the best candidates for cardiac recovery therapies.... Read More

Internal Medicine
Research
Jan 17, 2017

How Safe is That Driver Next to You? A Trucker’s Poor Health Could Increase Crash Risk

occupational health

As commuters shimmy past large trucks on the road, they may glance over and wonder, “How safe is that driver next to me?” If the truck driver is in poor health, the answer could be: Not very. Commercial truck drivers with three or more medical conditions double to quadruple their chance for being in a crash than healthier drivers, reports a new study led by investigators at the University of Utah School of Medicine. ... Read More

Family and Preventive Medicine
 Huntsman Cancer Institute Research Holds Promise for Personalized Lung Cancer Treatments
Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Research, Education
Jan 12, 2017

Huntsman Cancer Institute Research Holds Promise for Personalized Lung Cancer Treatments

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

New research from scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah uncovered distinct types of tumors within small cell lung cancer that look and act differently from one another. Scientists also identified a targeted drug combination that worked well with one specific tumor type. The study was published today in Cancer Cell. The findings suggest small cell lung cancer should not be treated as a uniform disease... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute Joins Nation’s Cancer Centers to Endorse Updated HPV Vaccine Recommendations
Education, Research, Clinical, Health Care Transformation
Jan 10, 2017

Huntsman Cancer Institute Joins Nation’s Cancer Centers to Endorse Updated HPV Vaccine Recommendations

Huntsman Cancer Institute, hpv, cancer prevention

Recognizing a critical need to improve national vaccination rates for human papillomavirus (HPV), Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah has united with each of the 69 National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer centers in support of recently revised recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).... Read More

Fixing Failing Hearts: Leaders in Heart Recovery to Convene at Utah Cardiac Recovery Symposium
Clinical, Research
Jan 04, 2017

Fixing Failing Hearts: Leaders in Heart Recovery to Convene at Utah Cardiac Recovery Symposium

Cardiovascular Center, , heart recovery, ucars

Can a failing heart recover? For many years, the answer to that question was unequivocally “No.” But as the University of Utah School of Medicine’s annual Utah Cardiac Recovery Symposium (U-CARS) will explore on Jan. 12-13, advances in treating heart failure are giving physicians, surgeons and researchers reason to hope the deadly disease might one day be defeated. ... Read More

Internal Medicine,Surgery
Research
Dec 26, 2016

Shoulder Pain Linked to Increased Heart Disease Risk

heart disease

After all the lifting, hauling and wrapping, worn out gift givers may blame the season’s physical strain for any shoulder soreness they are feeling. It turns out there could be another reason. A new study led by investigators at the University of Utah School of Medicine finds that individuals with symptoms that put them at increased risk for heart disease could be more likely to have shoulder problems, including joint pain and rotator cuff injury. ... Read More

Family and Preventive Medicine,Select...
The Moments That Define Us: A Look Back at 2016
Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Research, Education
Dec 20, 2016

The Moments That Define Us: A Look Back at 2016

It was an exceptional year for the Health Sciences clinical mission, for our students who train at one of the top systems in the nation, and for accelerating discoveries that can change the way we practice and deliver science and medicine. Enjoy our 2016 year-end recap. ... Read More

Research, Health Care Transformation, Education, Clinical
Dec 19, 2016

Huntsman Cancer Institute Leads International Colorectal Study

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah will head an international study to find out how lifestyle and other health factors impact colon and rectal cancer outcomes. HCI was awarded an $8.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to lead and expand an ongoing project in colon cancer research.... Read More

Research
Dec 19, 2016

Huntsman Cancer Institute Leads International Colorectal Study

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah will head an international study to find out how lifestyle and other health factors impact colon and rectal cancer outcomes. HCI was awarded an $8.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to lead and expand an ongoing project in colon cancer research.... Read More

Select...
A Bittersweet Farewell to Dr. Carrie Byington
Health Care Transformation, Education, Research, Clinical
Dec 13, 2016

A Bittersweet Farewell to Dr. Carrie Byington

As Dr. Carrie Byington prepares to return to her alma mater, Texas A&M, we celebrate her 21 years of incredible service and lasting contributions at the University of Utah. ... Read More

Research, Education
Dec 13, 2016

Voices in Precision Medicine: Speaking on the Law, Ethics, and Science

Huntsman Cancer Institute, Select..., , precision medicine, cancer, ethics

Precision medicine promises health care tailored to every individual, a mission that opens exciting possibilities and poses unique challenges. How do we control cost, equalize access to care, and speed the journey to success? On Dec 1 and 2, 2016, scientists, doctors, lawyers, and ethicists from across the country met to discuss these topics, and more.... Read More

Select...,Oncological Sciences,Internal Medicine,Human Genetics,Pediatrics
How to speed the journey from discovery to cure: Make a science out of science
Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation
Dec 09, 2016

How to speed the journey from discovery to cure: Make a science out of science

Precision medicine has a commitment problem. There’s no question that understanding the biology behind disease can lead to tailored treatments. Take the cancer drug crizotinib, for example. It can extend the life of some of the 7 percent of lung cancer patients who have an abnormality in a particular gene. But right now, there aren’t nearly enough targeteted drugs like it. ... Read More

Research, Clinical, Recognition
Dec 09, 2016

University of Utah Hospital chosen for national pilot program studying methods of quality monitoring in kidney transplant

Transplant, Select..., Transplant Program, ,

The University of Utah Hospital is one of 19 transplant hospitals nationwide and the only hospital in Utah named to participate in the COIIN (Collaborative Innovation and Improvement Network) pilot program, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced.... Read More

Select...,Surgery
The Ethical Quandary of Precision Medicine: Who Gets Left Out?
Research, Clinical, Health Care Transformation
Dec 06, 2016

The Ethical Quandary of Precision Medicine: Who Gets Left Out?

Whether you’re a family doctor weary of one-size-fits-all approaches to treating your patients, a science junkie, or the parent of a child with a mysterious, undiagnosed disease, it’s easy to get excited about the budding promise of precision medicine.... Read More

Research, Health Care Transformation, Clinical
Dec 05, 2016

In cancer treatment, is precision medicine more expensive than it’s worth?

Cancer is expensive. And precisely targeted cancer is even more costly. With specialized oncology drugs now the driving force behind spiking pharmaceutical prices across U.S. health care, cancer treatment highlights the Catch-22 of precision medicine: its life-changing genetic discoveries paired with (at-times) astronomical costs.... Read More

Virus-Inspired Delivery System Transfers Microscopic Cargo Between Human Cells
Research
Nov 30, 2016

Virus-Inspired Delivery System Transfers Microscopic Cargo Between Human Cells

virus, protein design

Scientists from the University of Utah and University of Washington have developed blueprints that instruct human cells to assemble a virus-like delivery system that can transport custom cargo from one cell to another. As reported online in Nature on Nov. 30, the research is a step toward a nature-inspired means for delivering therapeutics directly to specific cell types within the body.... Read More

Select...,Biochemistry
This Is Your Brain on God
Research
Nov 28, 2016

This Is Your Brain on God

brain, neuroscience

Religious and spiritual experiences activate the brain reward circuits in much the same way as love, sex, gambling, drugs and music, report researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine. The findings were published Nov. 29 in the journal Social Neuroscience. ... Read More

Select...,Radiology
U College of Pharmacy’s Program Awarded $19.5M Contract Renewal  To Identify Compounds for Treating Therapy-Resistant Epilepsy
Research, Recognition
Nov 18, 2016

U College of Pharmacy’s Program Awarded $19.5M Contract Renewal To Identify Compounds for Treating Therapy-Resistant Epilepsy

epilepsy

The University of Utah College of Pharmacy’s Anticonvulsant Drug Development (ADD) Program has been awarded a five-year $19.5 million contract renewal with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to test drugs to treat epilepsy, and the major focus of the project is to address needs that affect millions of people worldwide –identify novel investigational compounds to prevent the development of epilepsy or to treat refractory, or drug-resistant, epilepsy. ... Read More

Select...
Education, Research
Nov 18, 2016

U Symposium on the Law, Ethics, and Science of Precision Medicine

Huntsman Cancer Institute, , genetics, genomics, precision medicine

On Dec. 1-2, national experts in genetics, medicine, law, big data and other will fields gather for Frontiers in Precision Medicine II: Cancer, Big Data and the Public, a unique precision medicine symposium at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law. The symposium, sponsored by the U’s Colleges of Law, School of Medicine, Huntsman Cancer Institute, and the University of Utah Center for Excellence in ELSI Research (UCEER) addresses topics in law, ethics, and science as precision medicine is gaining more attention nationwide from health care systems, practitioners, researchers, insurers and federal agencies. ... Read More

Select...
The social aspect of cancer care
Research, Health Care Transformation, Education, Clinical
Nov 15, 2016

The social aspect of cancer care

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Like any major illness, cancer affects more than the body. It wreaks havoc on the lives and emotions of patients and their families. Ask Judi Evans, who was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer and told she had just six months to live. “My daughter and I looked at each other, and we said ‘no, we're not accepting that.’ So we immediately came to Huntsman Cancer Institute.”... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute Commits to “Just Bag It”  To Eradicate Deadly Medical Error
Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Research, Education
Nov 10, 2016

Huntsman Cancer Institute Commits to “Just Bag It” To Eradicate Deadly Medical Error

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

As part of its ongoing commitment to patient safety, Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah is standing with a national campaign to end a dangerous chemotherapy error. Just Bag It: The NCCN Campaign for Safe Vincristine Handling, launched today by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), encourages health care providers to adopt a policy to always dilute and administer the medication vincristine in a mini IV-drip bag to prevent the improper administration of the drug.... Read More

Research
Nov 10, 2016

The XX Factor

research, diversity

We've still got a long way to go in supporting women in science and medicine. Nationwide, only 20 percent of assistant professors in STEM and medical colleges are women. And pay inequity is alive and well; A recent study of New England researchers found that male scientists received more than 2.5 times the startup funding than their female counterparts did.... Read More

Massage therapy helps rub out stress for cancer patients
Research, Education, Health Care Transformation, Clinical
Nov 10, 2016

Massage therapy helps rub out stress for cancer patients

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Sometimes a therapy not often associated with cancer care can make a huge difference in a patient’s recovery. Massage therapy at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) complements standard cancer treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy. One patient says it’s improving his quality of life dramatically.... Read More

Nurturing an Ecosystem of Discovery and Care
Research, Clinical, Education
Nov 08, 2016

Nurturing an Ecosystem of Discovery and Care

At University of Utah Health Sciences, we believe that the greatest discoveries in science and the biggest leaps in clinical care come from thinking outside our boxes, departments and disciplines.... Read More

Why Are Some Obese People at Higher Risk for Diabetes Than Others?
Research
Nov 03, 2016

Why Are Some Obese People at Higher Risk for Diabetes Than Others?

Select..., Diabetes, , diabetes

For years, scientists have known that someone who is thin could still end up with diabetes. Yet an obese person may be surprisingly healthy. Now, new research led by scientists at University of Utah College of Health and published in Cell Metabolism points toward an answer to that riddle. An accumulation of a toxic class of fat metabolites, known as ceramides, may increase the risk for type 2 diabetes. ... Read More

Select...
How can we help patients have a good death?
Research, Education
Nov 03, 2016

How can we help patients have a good death?

education, learning

When Joan Sheetz, M.D., and Anna C. Beck, M.D., met during their work at Salt Lake City’s Fourth Street Clinic for the homeless, they were able to recognize a shared interest in the humanistic side of medicine—the ability to look beyond the illness or injury to the person behind the problem. ... Read More

Telephones: Simple technology can improve cancer treatment
Clinical, Research, Education, Health Care Transformation
Oct 31, 2016

Telephones: Simple technology can improve cancer treatment

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

People use phones for just about everything these days—reading emails, checking the weather, or catching up on news. Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) want to add extended patient care to that list. They’re testing a telehealth system called “Symptom Care at Home” to help keep patients as healthy as possible during cancer treatment. Kathi Mooney, PhD, co-leader of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at HCI, says the idea behind the program is that cancer patients’ symptoms don’t happen only while they are at the doctor’s office. Dr. Mooney has spent 15 years trying to improve patient care through a relatively simple technology—the telephone.... Read More

Research
Oct 27, 2016

Is More, Better? Finding the Balance Between Nutritional Supplements and Eye Health

eye health

In the past decade, ophthalmologists have been prescribing nutritional supplements to be taken daily to prevent or slow vision loss from age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Now, using nutritional supplements for eye health has become more common. But does increasing the recommended dose increase your protection? A case report appearing online in JAMA Ophthalmology from the Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah reveals what can happen when a patient takes more of a supplement than their body needs. ... Read More

Select...,Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences
 Promise of Better Targeted Treatments Now Possible in Children’s Brain Cancer
Health Care Transformation, Education, Research, Clinical
Oct 27, 2016

Promise of Better Targeted Treatments Now Possible in Children’s Brain Cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

SALT LAKE CITY—More than 4,000 children and teens are diagnosed with brain cancer each year and the disease kills more children than any other cancer. Writing this week in the journal Cell Reports, researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah report they have identified an existing group of drugs that appear to reduce or eliminate a certain subgroup of childhood brain cancers while sparing normal brain tissue. The research was conducted using a new zebrafish animal model system developed by the researchers, which closely resembles an aggressive subtype of pediatric brain tumors.... Read More

Oncological Sciences
Minimizing the side effects of cancer therapy
Research, Clinical, Education, Health Care Transformation
Oct 24, 2016

Minimizing the side effects of cancer therapy

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

It's a familiar struggle to anyone dealing with cancer; the treatments that get rid of the disease can also have serious side effects. Doctors at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) are working to reduce the negative effects of cancer treatment by pinpointing radiation therapy within a millimeter of where the cancer resides. Karen Curtis has a family history of cancer. The disease took the lives of her mother and sister. When she was diagnosed with cervical cancer last February, she assumed she didn't have much time to live. "The first time I found out I didn't cry, I didn't have any emotions about it," she says. "But, then you start going through it and you start losing your hair, and you start losing everything, it's like you're losing your dignity." ... Read More

“That pizza was #delish!” What Do Tweets Say About Our Health?
Research
Oct 17, 2016

“That pizza was #delish!” What Do Tweets Say About Our Health?

health

"Coffee" was the most tweeted food in the continental U.S. from mid-2014 to mid-2015 followed by "beer" then "pizza". Besides hinting at which foods are popular, VPCAT scholar Quynh Nguyen, Ph.D., assistant professor at the University of Utah College of Health, and colleagues, are finding that tweets may reveal something about our health. A study published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance reports that communities that tweeted more often about physical activities, or expressed positive sentiments about healthy foods, had better overall health.... Read More

Select...
HCI researchers work to improve childhood cancer treatments
Education, Research, Clinical, Health Care Transformation
Oct 17, 2016

HCI researchers work to improve childhood cancer treatments

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Lilli Hartvigsen remembers the moment her three-year-old son Ethan was diagnosed with cancer. “On November 7th, three weeks after he had an MRI, they told us it was lymphoma,” she says. It began as a limp and quickly became a parent’s worst nightmare. “They actually did a bone scan, and it was all over his bones,” Lilli explains, “Stage 4 cancer. It was terrible.” ... Read More

Utah caregivers, patients hope new 3-D tech can make breast cancer easier to catch, prevent
Research, Education, Health Care Transformation, Clinical
Oct 17, 2016

Utah caregivers, patients hope new 3-D tech can make breast cancer easier to catch, prevent

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Cindy Shepherd hasn't missed a yearly mammogram since her sister was diagnosed with breast cancer about 16 years ago. Shepherd didn't need a reminder to keep that appointment after watching her sister go through a lumpectomy, chemotherapy and radiation. But she got one anyway five years ago when her mother, too, was diagnosed with breast cancer, the disease so advanced she had to have a double mastectomy. In Utah, breast cancer is the leading cause of female cancer death: In 2012, there were 115.5 cases of breast cancer and 20.5 breast cancer deaths per 100,000 women, according to the state Department of Health.... Read More

Born Rich or Poor? Where You Begin Life Affects Cancer Risk Later
Research, Education, Clinical, Health Care Transformation
Oct 13, 2016

Born Rich or Poor? Where You Begin Life Affects Cancer Risk Later

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

SALT LAKE CITY—Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah announced today the results of a study that found that circumstances in childhood, such as parental occupation at birth and neighborhood income, may be associated with different risks of certain cancers later in life. HCI researchers and collaborators at Rutgers University in New Jersey and Temple University Health System in Philadelphia analyzed cancer risk and socioeconomic status (SES) of Baby Boomers (for this study, those born during 1945 – 1959,) in two Utah counties. ... Read More

6 Tips to Lower Breast Cancer Risk
Education, Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation
Oct 11, 2016

6 Tips to Lower Breast Cancer Risk

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) and University of Utah Health Care (UUHC) know it's important for all community members to understand breast cancer, screenings and prevention. Today they share the top things you can do to help lower your rise of breast cancer.... Read More

Treatment for skin cancer helps stop thyroid cancer
Research, Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Education
Oct 10, 2016

Treatment for skin cancer helps stop thyroid cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Doctors at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) are discovering some treatments that work for one type of cancer may also work for another, if it has similar mutations, or genetic changes. Genetic changes, or mutations, change some normal cells in the body into cancer cells which can grow and multiply. There are more than 100 types of cancer, which means many different ways to treat cancer are needed. Most cancers are named for the part of the body where they started.... Read More

Utah’s Mary Beckerle ‘a powerful voice’ on Cancer Moonshot Initiative
Clinical, Research, Education, Health Care Transformation
Oct 07, 2016

Utah’s Mary Beckerle ‘a powerful voice’ on Cancer Moonshot Initiative

Huntsman Cancer Institute, beckerle

There's something about Utah's uncluttered landscape and expansive blue sky that gives Mary Beckerle a sense of mental space. It helps her think, she says, and fuels her desire to explore both mentally and physically. It's the reason the New Jersey native came to the Beehive State in the 1980s to teach at the University of Utah. Thirty years later, she's found herself in the Huntsman Cancer Institute's corner office as its CEO, with wall-to-wall windows overlooking the geography she loves so much.... Read More

Lynch syndrome research could prevent cancer deaths
Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Education, Research
Oct 03, 2016

Lynch syndrome research could prevent cancer deaths

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Cancer isn’t the first hardship dealt to Carrie Grindle-Lyons. In 2008, she delivered a baby boy at 22 weeks. He was stillborn. Her doctor asked her not to try getting pregnant again right away because she had fibroids in her uterus. They were removed with surgery that left her uterus in place. A year after she lost her baby, Carrie went in for a checkup. What doctors found devastated her. “The fibroids grew back, and they found out I had endometrial cancer,” she says. ... Read More

Tiny needles make big impact on quality of life for cancer patients
Clinical, Research, Education, Health Care Transformation
Oct 03, 2016

Tiny needles make big impact on quality of life for cancer patients

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

To say Annie Budhathoki, DAOM, L.Ac., was skeptical of acupuncture would be an understatement. “I thought acupuncture was the devil’s work,” she says. Then she was in a horrific accident. After more than two years of surgeries and recovery, she still had to walk with a cane. She turned to acupuncture as a last resort to relieve the pain in her leg, and quickly became a believer. After three sessions she was able to walk, cane-free. ... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah Announces New Leadership
Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Education, Research
Sep 29, 2016

Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah Announces New Leadership

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

SALT LAKE CITY—Officials at University of Utah Health Care (UUHC) today announced that Ben Tanner, Huntsman Cancer Institute’s (HCI) current director of clinical operations and chief operating officer (COO) has been named the cancer hospital’s executive director, replacing Ray Lynch, who is retiring after 13 years of service. Tanner will assume his duties immediately.... Read More

Case Study Reports Details of Mysterious Utah Zika-Related Death
Research
Sep 28, 2016

Case Study Reports Details of Mysterious Utah Zika-Related Death

Internal Medicine, , zika, infectious disease

Researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine and ARUP Laboratories in Salt Lake City unravel the mystery behind a rare Zika-related death in an adult, and unconventional transmission to a second patient in a correspondence published online on September 28 in the New England Journal of Medicine. Details point to an unusually high concentration of virus in the first patient’s blood as being responsible for his death. The phenomenon may also explain how the second patient may have contracted the virus through casual contact with the primary patient, the first such documented case. ... Read More

Pathology
Live in Utah? You’re likely in one of the world’s largest genetic databases
Health Care Transformation, Education, Research, Clinical
Sep 23, 2016

Live in Utah? You’re likely in one of the world’s largest genetic databases

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Lisa Callister walked into LDS Hospital in 2012 for a routine colonoscopy. She walked out knowing a tumor had been growing unchecked in her colon for about six years. She battled for more than a year as colon cancer ravaged her body. Doctors had to remove the entire organ. But the ordeal might have been avoided, Callister said, if she had previously known that she had Lynch Syndrome, an inherited disorder that increases the risk of many cancers. The gene runs in her family, but Callister, her sister, Emily Scalley, and their siblings had not been tested. ... Read More

HCI Scientist Receives $1M Award to Fund Cancer Research
Health Care Transformation, Education, Research, Clinical
Sep 22, 2016

HCI Scientist Receives $1M Award to Fund Cancer Research

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

SALT LAKE CITY—Jody Rosenblatt, Ph.D., a cell biologist at Huntsman Cancer Institute and an associate professor of oncological sciences at the University of Utah has been selected as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Faculty Scholar, HHMI announced today: https://www.hhmi.org/news/philanthropies-announce-selection-faculty-scholars. The award provides $1 million to fund her research over the course of five years.... Read More

A vaccine prevents cancer, yet few use it
Research, Health Care Transformation, Education, Clinical
Sep 19, 2016

A vaccine prevents cancer, yet few use it

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Thousands of lives could be saved by a simple vaccination to protect against Human Papillomavirus (HPV). Yet only 51% of teens receive the vaccine each year. Every year more than four thousand people die from cancers related to HPV. It's upsetting, it's really upsetting,” says Deanna Kepka, PhD, MPH, a population scientist at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI). “If you ask any cancer survivor whether they would have taken an opportunity to get a vaccine that prevented their cancer, they would say yes.”... Read More

Insurance slow to 'catch up' with cancer drug as Utah man runs out of time
Research, Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Education
Sep 16, 2016

Insurance slow to 'catch up' with cancer drug as Utah man runs out of time

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

To look at 52-year-old Mark Wilson, actively keeping up with the high school baseball players he coaches, you'd never know that cancer is tearing his body apart. “It's a sarcoma,” Wilson said. “I was diagnosed with it in October of 1999." He has survived thanks to a strong disposition as well as the strong work of his doctors and nurses.... Read More

‘Liking’ Our Way to a Cure for Cancer
Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation, Education
Sep 16, 2016

‘Liking’ Our Way to a Cure for Cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Researchers recently revealed in a Nature Genetics paper that they had identified a new gene linked to ALS, a neurodegenerative condition also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The July announcement was a milestone in the fight against ALS, which affects about 30,000 Americans, and a historic moment in financing disease research. ... Read More

Super Sleepers or Dangerously Drowsy?
Research
Sep 15, 2016

Super Sleepers or Dangerously Drowsy?

brain, sleep

Most people could benefit from a few extra hours of sleep every night. But some people habitually sleep much less than the recommended amount, yet report feeling no ill effects. A new University of Utah study, published Sept. 15 in Brain and Behavior, finds that patterns of neural connections in the brains of so-called “habitual short sleepers” suggest that some of these people may be efficient sleepers, but may also be more tired than they realize.... Read More

Radiology
Improving Cancer Prevention and Care among Underserved Individuals Focus of New Huntsman Center for HOPE
Research, Education, Health Care Transformation, Clinical
Sep 14, 2016

Improving Cancer Prevention and Care among Underserved Individuals Focus of New Huntsman Center for HOPE

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

SALT LAKE CITY—Officials at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah today announced the creation of a new center to be housed in the soon-to-be-completed expansion of HCI’s research enterprise, the Primary Children’s and Families’ Cancer Research Center. The new center will be called the Huntsman Center for Health Outcomes and Population Equity (HOPE) and will focus on discovering new ways to prevent and treat cancer among underserved populations, including individuals living in poverty and residents of rural (between 6.1 and 99.9 persons/sq. mile) and frontier (<6.1 persons/sq. mile) areas.... Read More

Moving the Needle on Health Care Quality and Costs
Health Care Transformation, Research
Sep 13, 2016

Moving the Needle on Health Care Quality and Costs

health care transformation

Bucking national trends, a University of Utah Health Care program is making a difference in healthcare quality and cost, reports a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). The value driven outcomes program breaks down health procedure costs to the level of each bandage and minutes of nursing time. After addressing inefficiencies exposed in three procedures - joint replacement, in-hospital laboratory testing, and sepsis management – patients fared better and costs fell. ... Read More

Orthopaedics,Internal Medicine
Snails’ Speedy Insulin
Research
Sep 12, 2016

Snails’ Speedy Insulin

diabetes

University of Utah researchers have found that the structure of an insulin molecule produced by predatory cone snails may be an improvement over current fast-acting therapeutic insulin. The finding suggests that the cone snail insulin, produced by the snails to stun their prey, could begin working in as few as five minutes, compared with 15 minutes for the fastest-acting insulin currently available. ... Read More

Biochemistry
Factor Isolated From Babies’ Cord Blood Could Treat Harmful Inflammation, Sepsis
Research
Sep 06, 2016

Factor Isolated From Babies’ Cord Blood Could Treat Harmful Inflammation, Sepsis

Internal Medicine, , cord blood

A factor found in umbilical cord blood could become the basis for developing a new therapy to fight harmful inflammation, University of Utah School of Medicine researchers report. When given to mice, the newly discovered factor countered signs of inflammation and sepsis, such as fever, fluctuations in respiratory rate, and death. The factor circulates in the blood of newborns for about two weeks after birth and is not found in older babies or adults, according to the study published online Sept. 6, 2016, in The Journal of Clinical Investigation. ... Read More

Internal Medicine
Simple Saline Spray Could Be As Effective As Drug Therapy for Treating Chronic Nosebleeds
Research
Sep 06, 2016

Simple Saline Spray Could Be As Effective As Drug Therapy for Treating Chronic Nosebleeds

Cardiovascular Center, , hht, nosebleeds

Squirting a simple saline solution into the nose twice a day could alleviate chronic nosebleeds just as effectively as spraying with any one of three different medications, reports a study published in JAMA and led by Kevin Whitehead, M.D., F.A.H.A., associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Utah School of Medicine and director of the Utah HHT Clinical Center.... Read More

Internal Medicine
Not a family curse, but an inherited cancer syndrome
Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Research, Education
Sep 02, 2016

Not a family curse, but an inherited cancer syndrome

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

As a child, Eleana used to think her family was cursed. Her father, grandparents, and several aunts, uncles and cousins all had cancer and passed away at a young age. One cousin died of lung cancer when he was just 12 years old. “I was afraid to let anyone get attached to me and I was afraid to get attached to anyone,” she says. “I thought if I love somebody they're going to die, if somebody loves me, they're going to die.” When her daughter, Kiera, complained of a sharp pain in her side that wouldn’t go away, Eleana took her to Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI). Kiera was diagnosed with pleomorphic sarcoma, an aggressive form of cancer, at the age of 19. After several months of treatment and surgery on her abdomen, Kiera was pronounced cancer-free. Kiera’s experience with cancer gave her a new life mission. She became a cancer researcher at HCI.... Read More

Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Research, Education
Aug 30, 2016

Part of $22 Million Awarded in New Grants by the St. Baldrick’s Foundation

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah (August 30, 2016) – The St. Baldrick’s Foundation, a volunteer-powered and donor-centered charity dedicated to raising money for childhood cancer research, is proud to award a $90,650 St. Baldrick’s Research Grant to support the work of Anne Kirchhoff, Ph.D., a researcher at Huntsman Cancer Institute and the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Utah. Air pollution is an ongoing problem in many communities throughout the U.S. Air pollution is a major health concern in the state of Utah, with its cities often ranking atop EPA’s list of cities with the worst short-term air pollution in the U.S. Children are particularly vulnerable to pollution-induced illnesses. For children who have had cancer, many face pulmonary-related health problems due to chemotherapy, radiation and surgery they endured to treat their cancer. It’s likely that short-term exposure to air pollutants could exacerbate acute pulmonary issues in childhood cancer survivors.... Read More

New Huntsman Cancer Institute Program Personalizes Lifelong Patient Care
Research, Clinical
Aug 29, 2016

New Huntsman Cancer Institute Program Personalizes Lifelong Patient Care

Huntsman Cancer Institute, beckerle

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah is launching a unique program, called HCI-Total Cancer Care, which will follow patients through cancer screenings, treatments, and into good health throughout their lives. The program, which is borne out of HCI’s membership in the Oncology Research Information Exchange Network (ORIEN), utilizes patient data to help match patients to clinical trials and treatment developments happening across the country, offering never-before-seen access to cutting edge innovations in cancer care, while tracking a patient’s health throughout his or her lifetime.... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute Launches Personalized Care And Research Program
Health Care Transformation, Research, Education, Clinical
Aug 29, 2016

Huntsman Cancer Institute Launches Personalized Care And Research Program

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

The Huntsman Cancer Institute is launching a new program that combines genetic research with lifelong treatment for cancer patients. It’s is a part of the Huntsman Cancer Institute’s membership in the Oncology Research Information Exchange Network, or ORIEN. More than a dozen of the nation’s top cancer research centers are part of the network, which was built to share data about cancer between the institutions.... Read More

Want To Know Her: Cindy Matsen
Research, Education, Clinical, Health Care Transformation
Aug 26, 2016

Want To Know Her: Cindy Matsen

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Today's Want To Know Her spotlights a top notch surgeon with an impressive list of academic and professional honors, juggling life as a wife and mom, too. Dr. Cindy Matsen is a breast cancer surgeon treating mothers, sisters, wives and daughters battling breast cancer.... Read More

Body Fatness and Cancer — Viewpoint of the IARC Working Group
Research, Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Education
Aug 25, 2016

Body Fatness and Cancer — Viewpoint of the IARC Working Group

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

People who are overweight or obese are at higher risk for more cancers than previously thought, says a report published in the New England Journal of Medicine today. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) brought together a group of 21 researchers from around the world to look at more than 1,000 studies linking excess body fat and cancer. Neli Ulrich, PhD, senior director of Population Sciences at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah, was a member of the group. Ulrich is a cancer researcher who studies lifestyle and biologic factors in cancer prevention and cancer prognosis. ... Read More

Clinical, Education, Health Care Transformation, Research
Aug 24, 2016

11 female CEOs making their mark in healthcare

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

As CEOs, these 10 women have positively impacted their hospitals and health systems, and the greater healthcare industry. Vivian S. Lee, MD, PhD, MBA, serves as the CEO of University of Utah Healthcare in Salt Lake City. In her role, she oversees four hospitals, 10 health centers, the Huntsman Cancer Institute and Moran Eye Center and five colleges. Under Dr. Lee's leadership the health system has ranked among the nation's top 10 in quality and safety academic hospitals. Dr. Lee oversaw the opening of the School of Dentistry and the launch of the Utah Genome Project. She is on the Council of Councils of the National Institutes of Health, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and the Scientific Advisory Board of Massachusetts General Hospital, among other organizations.... Read More

New Tribune owner says Huntsman Sr. will have role at paper
Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Research, Education
Aug 22, 2016

New Tribune owner says Huntsman Sr. will have role at paper

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

The wealthy new owner of The Salt Lake Tribune says his father, Utah billionaire and industrialist Jon Huntsman Sr., will serve in a role at the newspaper as chairman emeritus. Deputy editor Tim Fitzpatrick says Tribune publisher Paul Huntsman made the announcement with his father Monday during a meeting with the newspaper's staff and new editor Jennifer Napier-Pearce.... Read More

Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Education, Research
Aug 11, 2016

Cancer Genetics, Inc. reports second quarter 2016 financial results and provides company updates

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Cancer Genetics, Inc. (Nasdaq:CGIX), an emerging leader in molecular and biomarker-based cancer diagnostics, announced today financial and operating results for the second quarter ended June 30, 2016 and provided other company and business updates. Total revenues were $7.0 million in the second quarter of 2016 and included $4.2 million from Biopharma services and $2.5 million from Clinical services, compared with total revenue of $4.2 million in the second quarter of 2015, an increase of 67 percent.... Read More

Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Education, Research
Aug 08, 2016

Colonoscopy pill, replete with nano-x-ray machine inside, in development

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Check-Cap Ltd. (the “Company” or “Check-Cap”) (NASDAQ: CHEK, CHEKW), a clinical stage medical diagnostics company engaged in the development of an ingestible capsule for preparation-free, colorectal cancer screening, today announced it has entered into an agreement with GE Healthcare to develop and validate high-volume manufacturing for X-ray source production and assembly into Check-Cap’s capsule. Upon successful completion, the parties may discuss collaboration on execution of a high-volume manufacturing facility and distribution of the Check-Cap system.... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute One of the Top in the Nation; University of Utah Hospital Best in Utah, according to latest U.S. News & World Report Rankings
Health Care Transformation, Research, Education, Clinical
Aug 02, 2016

Huntsman Cancer Institute One of the Top in the Nation; University of Utah Hospital Best in Utah, according to latest U.S. News & World Report Rankings

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

U.S. News & World Report has released its 2016-2017 Best Hospital Rankings and named University of Utah’s Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) one of the top 50 cancer hospitals in the country. “We are extremely pleased to be recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the nation’s top cancer hospitals,” said Mary Beckerle, CEO and director of HCI. “Cancer touches the lives of everyone, and this recognition reflects our efforts to relieve the burden of this disease on our patients and their families through excellent patient care and robust scientific research. We are motivated by the idea that it is possible to defeat cancer.” ... Read More

Research, Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Education
Aug 02, 2016

Madison Memorial, Huntsman Institute partner up

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Madison Memorial Hospital officials last week announced a new affiliation with the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah. Madison Memorial Hospital is a 69-bed, full-service medical facility. Huntsman Cancer Institute is one of the world’s top academic research and cancer treatment centers, a Madison Memorial news release said. Madison Memorial’s partnership with the Salt Lake City-based Institute will extend its resources to Madison County and the surrounding communities, the release said. The agreement, which formalizes a long tradition of collaboration between the two entities, sets the stage for Madison Memorial to provide improved patient access to cancer specialties including clinical trials and other research efforts, the release said.... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute One of the Top in the Nation; University of Utah Hospital Best in Utah, according to latest U.S. News & World Report Rankings
Education, Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation
Aug 02, 2016

Huntsman Cancer Institute One of the Top in the Nation; University of Utah Hospital Best in Utah, according to latest U.S. News & World Report Rankings

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

SALT LAKE CITY—U.S. News & World Report has released its 2016-2017 Best Hospital Rankings and named University of Utah’s Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) one of the top 50 cancer hospitals in the country. “We are extremely pleased to be recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the nation’s top cancer hospitals,” said Mary Beckerle, CEO and director of HCI. “Cancer touches the lives of everyone, and this recognition reflects our efforts to relieve the burden of this disease on our patients and their families through excellent patient care and robust scientific research. We are motivated by the idea that it is possible to defeat cancer.”... Read More

Salt Lake City congregation embraces the mysteries of both science and religion
Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Education, Research
Aug 02, 2016

Salt Lake City congregation embraces the mysteries of both science and religion

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

For Chris Jensen, science and religion are like "the marriage of two mysteries." A biologist and senior laboratory specialist with the Huntsman Cancer Institute, Jensen said his work enriches and reinforces his Lutheran faith. Science looks at objects large and small, he said, and God is present in all of them. "Things just work really, really elegantly and beautifully together," he said. "Whether you take faith as the answer to that or not is individual." Jensen is a member of Salt Lake City's Mount Tabor Lutheran Church, where the interplay between science and faith — often seen in conflict — is encouraged and celebrated.... Read More

Better health before surgery leads to better outcomes
Clinical, Education, Health Care Transformation, Research
Aug 01, 2016

Better health before surgery leads to better outcomes

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Surgery is part of cancer treatment plans in many cases. While surgery is an important part of treatment, recovery from surgery has a major impact on overall health. Strong for Surgery is a program that focuses on making small changes in health before surgery. Making these changes, even just before surgery, can make a big difference in recovery.... Read More

Therapy on four legs
Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Research, Education
Aug 01, 2016

Therapy on four legs

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Every week, a special visitor appears at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI). His job? To cheer up patients fighting cancer and their family members. His name is Misio, and he’s a therapy dog with Intermountain Therapy Animals. Kathy McNulty, a volunteer with the organization, is Misio’s escort. Kathy says Misio has only been coming to HCI for a few months, but she can already see the difference he’s making for patients and their families. “Over and over, I’ve seen tears turn to smiles,” she says. “Misio takes their minds off the procedures.”... Read More

Why Do Elephants Almost Never Get Cancer?
Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Education, Research
Jul 31, 2016

Why Do Elephants Almost Never Get Cancer?

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

P53 – one gene that may hold the key. Humans have two copies, but some people are missing a copy. For individuals with only one working copy of P53, their lifetime risk of cancer is nearly 100 percent. Elephants, after 55 million years of evolution, have 40 copies of the P53 gene. Those extra copies protect elephant’s cells from cancer by eliminating cells that develops any type of mutation that could go on to become cancer.... Read More

Chemoprevention for People at High Risk
Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation, Education
Jul 31, 2016

Chemoprevention for People at High Risk

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Individuals with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) have a nearly 100 percent chance of developing colon cancer and often undergo surgery to remove the colon so cancer can’t develop there. A new medication being tested in a clinical trial lead by Jewel Samadder, MD, has shown promising results. The first round of testing shows that in less than six months, half of the patients who received medication saw a nearly 70% regression of polyps. For some, polyps disappeared completely.... Read More

NantHealth and University of Utah Establish Heritage 1K Project to Discover Genetic Causes of 25 Rare and Common Diseases
Recognition, Research
Jul 25, 2016

NantHealth and University of Utah Establish Heritage 1K Project to Discover Genetic Causes of 25 Rare and Common Diseases

NantHealth, Inc., a leading next-generation, evidence-based, personalized healthcare company, today announced that it has partnered with the University of Utah in analyzing the entire genomic profiles of at least 1,000 individuals who have a history of rare and life-threatening diseases and conditions in their respective families. The landmark project will focus on researching the genetic causes of 25 conditions, including, breast, colon, ovarian, and prostate cancers, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), chronic lymphocytic leukemia, autism, preterm birth, epilepsy, and other hereditary conditions. Genomic sequencing will be conducted with unique, comprehensive molecular tests offered by NantHealth. ... Read More

Human Genetics
Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Research, Education
Jul 22, 2016

Hope for a cancer-free future: chemoprevention for people at high risk

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Kathy and her niece, Rhonda, regularly make the trip from their small town in Illinois, to Salt Lake City. They don’t come to see family and friends or to cheer for the University of Utah. They come to Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) to be tested for polyps in their small intestines. Kathy and Rhonda both have familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), an inherited genetic disease. FAP causes hundreds of polyps to form throughout the small and large intestines. Any polyp in the intestine has the potential to become cancer. With so many polyps, people with FAP have a nearly 100-percent chance of developing colon cancer. Patients with FAP often undergo surgery to remove the colon so cancer can’t develop there.... Read More

Education, Research, Health Care Transformation, Clinical
Jul 21, 2016

St. Baldrick's Foundation Grants More Than $22 Million For Lifesaving Childhood Cancer Research

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

LOS ANGELES, July 21, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- The St. Baldrick's Foundation, a volunteer-powered charity dedicated to raising money for childhood cancer research, is proud to announce that it has awarded 79 new grants totaling more than $22 million to support the best and brightest researchers looking for cures and better treatments for all childhood cancers.... Read More

Clinical, Education, Health Care Transformation, Research
Jul 19, 2016

Cases of Aggressive Prostate Cancer on the Rise, Research Finds

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Cases of aggressive prostate cancer appear to be on the rise, researchers reported Tuesday. The good news is it's still rare for prostate cancer to spread. Just 3 percent of cases have already started spreading when men are diagnosed and prostate cancer overall has not become more common, the team found. And the American Cancer Society strongly questioned the findings and the methods used to get them.... Read More

Health Care Transformation, Education, Clinical, Research
Jul 19, 2016

Physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia: increasingly legal but still rare

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Legalized euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are mainly used by patients with cancer, but remain rare, according to a new analysis of such programs. In the last year alone, California has legalized physician-assisted suicide, Canada legalized both physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia, and Colombia performed its first legal euthanasia, said John Urwin, a study author from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. "In order to inform current debates, it's imperative to understand current laws and practices."... Read More

Madison Memorial teams up with Huntsman Cancer Institute on clinic
Education, Research, Health Care Transformation, Clinical
Jul 19, 2016

Madison Memorial teams up with Huntsman Cancer Institute on clinic

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Madison Memorial Hospital and the the Huntsman Cancer Institute have teamed up to better provide cancer patients with convenient and closer services. The goal of the project is to give local patients an easier commute, instead of traveling miles out of town for cancer services. CEO of Madison Memorial Hospital Rachel Gonzales said the last thing you want to do when your sick is think about the burden of traveling far. "You're not feeling well, you're stress you're afraid. You just received the scariest diagnosis of your life. And you're having to travel and leave your family often. So that travel time just adds more stress," Gonzales said. After all, the treatment requires temporarily increasing levels of certain sex hormones to five or 10 times the normal. Two of those hormones, estrogen and progesterone, can affect the course of certain kinds of breast cancer.... Read More

Education, Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Research
Jul 19, 2016

I.V.F. Does Not Raise Breast Cancer Risk, Study Shows

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Women undergoing in vitro fertilization have long worried that the procedure could raise their risk for breast cancer. After all, the treatment requires temporarily increasing levels of certain sex hormones to five or 10 times the normal. Two of those hormones, estrogen and progesterone, can affect the course of certain kinds of breast cancer.... Read More

Size Matters: Advance Could Increase Sensitivity of Liquid Biopsies
Research
Jul 18, 2016

Size Matters: Advance Could Increase Sensitivity of Liquid Biopsies

A University of Utah School of Medicine-led study reports an advance that could increase the accuracy of liquid biopsies. The blood test monitors cancer progression by detecting pieces of circulating tumor DNA, but results can be obscured by abundant DNA from healthy cells. The research published in PLOS Genetics shows that the two types of DNA fragments are typically differently sized in cancer patients, a property that can be exploited to enhance the test’s sensitivity. ... Read More

Pediatrics
Research, Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Education
Jul 15, 2016

Researchers identify new drug target for treating children with CNS-PNET

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) are the largest group of malignant brain tumors in children. They can arise from the brain's cerebellum or, more rarely, from tissue located throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Little is known about how CNS-PNETs develop, although these tumors are more aggressive than other PNETs and have an overall survival rate of only about 20 percent. In a new study, researchers for the first time have identified a possible target for a new CNS-PNET therapy.... Read More

Navigating Through Cancer
Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Education, Research
Jul 15, 2016

Navigating Through Cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Eduardo Ayala was 17 years old when he was diagnosed with testicular cancer. He is fluent in English and Spanish, but his parents speak only Spanish. Eduardo and his family came to HCI from Nevada for his treatments. It is one of the five Mountain West states at the core of HCI’s service area. Cancer has a language all its own and it’s that much harder if English is not your first language. That’s where Guadalupe Tovar, a health educator and patient navigator at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI), comes in. She helps Hispanic families navigate their cancer care.... Read More

Clinical, Research, Education, Health Care Transformation
Jul 15, 2016

First Drug Target Identified for Children with Rare Type of Brain Tumor

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) are the largest group of malignant brain tumors in children. They can arise from the brain's cerebellum or, more rarely, from tissue located throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Little is known about how CNS-PNETs develop, although these tumors are more aggressive than other PNETs and have an overall survival rate of only about 20 percent. In a new study, researchers for the first time have identified a possible target for a new CNS-PNET therapy.... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute Investigator Receives Leadership Award from the National Cancer Institute
Research, Education, Health Care Transformation
Jul 13, 2016

Huntsman Cancer Institute Investigator Receives Leadership Award from the National Cancer Institute

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

The National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Cancer Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Awards recognize and support outstanding clinical investigators at NCI-Designated Cancer Centers who participate extensively in NCI- funded collaborative clinical trials and whose leadership, participation, and activities promote a culture of successful clinical research. Established in 2009, the awards are intended to help retain investigators in academic clinical research careers. This year, 13 investigators nationwide, including Theresa Werner, MD, Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) investigator and University of Utah assistant professor of medicine have received the award.... Read More

Ovarian Cancer Symptoms and Treatments
Health Care Transformation, Education, Clinical, Research
Jul 08, 2016

Ovarian Cancer Symptoms and Treatments

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Ovarian cancer accounts for about three percent of cancers among women, but it causes more deaths than any other cancer of the female reproductive system - like uterine, cervix, Fallopian tube, vulvar and vaginal cancer The reason for this is ovarian cancer is almost always detected at advanced stages (meaning the tumor has typically spread by the time it is diagnosed). Due to this, it is very difficult to cure ovarian cancer.... Read More

Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Research, Education
Jul 08, 2016

"The Generation to End Cancer" - the Sigma Chi 20k Club

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

They call themselves “The Generation to End Cancer.” Sigma Chi fraternity brothers from across the United States sharing one goal – to raise $10 million for cancer research at HCI. For many Sigma Chi brothers, this fight against cancer is personal. Dan Shaver, chairman of the Sigma Chi Philanthropy Committee says, ,”We rarely come across someone whose family isn’t directly or indirectly affected by cancer. I just don’t think we’ll ever rest until we find the cure.” Sigma Chi fraternities raised $1.3 million during the 2015-2016 school year. 29 schools each raised more than $20 thousand dollars and traveled to Salt Lake to be inducted into the 20k club.... Read More

New trial gives hope to terminal cancer patients
Health Care Transformation, Research, Clinical, Education
Jul 01, 2016

New trial gives hope to terminal cancer patients

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Breast cancer is far too common. In fact, one in eight women will be diagnosed with the disease in her lifetime. Many will be treated with chemotherapy and radiation, giving them a strong chance of survival, but about 30%, more than 75,000 each year, will face a metastasized cancer that isn't curable.... Read More

Massive crowds hit Hill Air Force Base
Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation, Education
Jun 25, 2016

Massive crowds hit Hill Air Force Base

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

It was a special day for University of Utah Doctor Jason Hunt. He's the clinical director of head and neck surgical oncology at the huntsman cancer institute. He got to ride in an F-16 as part of their ‘Hometown Hero’ program.... Read More

Pig on the Plaza
Research, Clinical, Education, Health Care Transformation
Jun 24, 2016

Pig on the Plaza

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Famous Dave's BBQ is helping raise money for the Huntsman Cancer Institute by selling $6 lunch plates at the Gallivan Plaza on Friday. It starts at 11 a.m. Stop by to grab a bite for a good cause!... Read More

Data is Knowledge, Knowledge is Power
Research, Education, Health Care Transformation, Clinical
Jun 24, 2016

Data is Knowledge, Knowledge is Power

Huntsman Cancer Institute, u0030780

At Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI), researchers are using the power of Big Data to help prevent cancer. HCI is home of the Utah Population Database (UPDB), a shared data resource that tracks family medical history through many generations. The UPDB is the only database of its kind in the United States and one of few such resources in the world. The UPDB has contributed to important gene discoveries including those for colon cancer (APC), breast cancer (BRCA1), melanoma (p16), and others. Utilizing the UPDB, researchers are able to identify families that have higher than normal rates of certain cancers.... Read More

Research, Education, Clinical, Health Care Transformation
Jun 23, 2016

Detecting brain cancer without surgery

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

When a brain tumor is suspected because of symptoms such as headaches or other problems, its presence is usually confirmed by anatomical imaging such as CT or MRI. But through imaging, doctors often can't say much about the tumor - molecularly - besides 'something's in there.' Surgery and a biopsy are necessary to get a glimpse of the cancer cells themselves.... Read More

Health Care Transformation, Research, Education, Clinical
Jun 22, 2016

Person in custody on suspicion of igniting grass fire by Huntsman Cancer Institute

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

A person is in custody on suspicion of starting a grass fire by the Huntsman Cancer Institute, Monday evening. At about 5:30 p.m., Salt Lake City firefighters responded to several reports of the grass fire north of the building, according to tweets from the fire department. The flames covered a 50-foot by 50-foot area.... Read More

Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Education, Research
Jun 22, 2016

In-person, telephone genetic counseling yield similar outcomes

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Genetic counseling by telephone was noninferior to in-person counseling among women at increased risk of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer (HBOC) for all psychosocial, decision-making, and quality-of-life measures, investigators found. In addition, genetic testing was more common among women who received in-person counseling and women who lived in rural settings.... Read More

Education, Research, Health Care Transformation, Clinical
Jun 22, 2016

Kailos Genetics and Huntsman Cancer Institute Awarded $2.4 Million Grant for ctDNA Test Development

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Kailos Genetics, a personalized medicine information company offering leading-edge gene-based testing, today announced they have entered into a collaboration with Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah to develop a clinical-grade test for circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA). Backed by a $2.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the minimally invasive test will be used to monitor patients for breast cancer disease recurrence.... Read More

Dalai Lama Meets with Huntsman Cancer Institute Leaders, Blesses Patients
Research, Health Care Transformation, Education
Jun 21, 2016

Dalai Lama Meets with Huntsman Cancer Institute Leaders, Blesses Patients

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet met with patients and leaders of Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) and the University of Utah during a brief visit to Huntsman Cancer Institute today, Tuesday, June 21. His visit coincides with his appearance later in the afternoon at the University’s Jon M. Huntsman Center where he will speak about compassion and universal responsibility. ... Read More

Blood and Marrow Transplant: Hope for a Cure for Many Blood-Related Cancers
Education, Research, Health Care Transformation
Jun 21, 2016

Blood and Marrow Transplant: Hope for a Cure for Many Blood-Related Cancers

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

In the United States, someone is diagnosed with a blood-related cancer every three minutes. For many of them, a blood or marrow transplant is the only hope for a cure. More than two-thirds of these patients, however, don’t have a matched marrow donor in the family. Donor registries offer them the best hope for finding a match.... Read More

Person 2 Person: Mary Beckerle, Huntsman Cancer Institute CEO
Research, Health Care Transformation, Education, Clinical
Jun 20, 2016

Person 2 Person: Mary Beckerle, Huntsman Cancer Institute CEO

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Mary Beckerle is the CEO and Executive Director of the Huntsman Cancer Institute. Beckerle grew up in New Jersey. She lost her father to emphysema when she was just 12 years old. "We were a happy, normal family and then all of a sudden my dad starting having trouble breathing," she said. She recalls her father couldn't go downstairs to watch her and her sisters perform the plays they would make up.... Read More

What's Your Story
Education, Health Care Transformation, Research, Clinical
Jun 17, 2016

What's Your Story

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

That little phrase, a common conversation starter, takes on new meaning at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI). There, a program called Your Story gives cancer patients the chance to reflect on and share their life stories.... Read More

Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Research, Education
Jun 17, 2016

A colorful plate helps protect against cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

You don't smoke. You wear sunscreen. You exercise regularly. But your breakfast usually consists of a donut or store-bought muffin as you run out the door, lunch is something from the vending machine, and dinner is grabbed at the drive-thru. These decisions about what you eat may be doing more harm to your health than you think.... Read More

2016 Outstanding Director Awards
Education, Research, Clinical, Health Care Transformation
Jun 15, 2016

2016 Outstanding Director Awards

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

It is impossible to quantify the value a director brings to a board and the organization it serves. Most board directors hold a uniquely wide perspective, having gleaned hard-won wisdom from decades of experience within their own industry and, typically, multiple other industries and nonprofit endeavors. This is the case with this year’s Outstanding Directors, who have founded or led large organizations, as well as given their passion and resources to nonprofit efforts.... Read More

Utah Has Highest Skin Cancer Rate In Nation
Research, Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Education
Jun 10, 2016

Utah Has Highest Skin Cancer Rate In Nation

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

New statistics out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention find that Utah has the highest rate of skin cancer in the nation. Mark Hyde is a Physician Assistant on the Melanoma Team at the Huntsman Cancer Institute. He says it’s a combination of risk factors that make Utahns so susceptible to melanoma.... Read More

Subway Helps Fuel Cancer Research at Huntsman 140
Health Care Transformation, Research, Clinical, Education
Jun 10, 2016

Subway Helps Fuel Cancer Research at Huntsman 140

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

In its sixth year, the Huntsman 140 has grown in attendance, and in overall fundraising. This event is a friendly fundraising ride designed to bring the community together toward a common goal of expanding cancer research for children and families. This year, Subway stores are sponsoring the event by providing sandwiches for riders to fuel up during the ride. Ed Brunisholz, a local Subway sandwich shop owner and rider in the Huntsman 140, said there are Subway owners across the state that have a family member with cancer, and that even some of their regular guests are affected by the disease.... Read More

Partners to Prevent Cancer
Education, Research, Clinical, Health Care Transformation
Jun 10, 2016

Partners to Prevent Cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

JOSHUA SCHIFFMAN IS A LOVER OF ALL THINGS ELEPHANT. As a pediatric oncologist and a professor in the University of Utah’s Department of Pediatrics, he and his exceptional team from Primary Children’s Hospital, Huntsman Cancer Institute, and the University of Utah are working to expand the focus of childhood cancer research to include prevention— and elephants have become important partners in that work. Curious, we sat down with Dr. Schiffman to find out more. A new artist in residence program allows cancer patients bring some color back to their lives by expressing themselves through art.... Read More

A New Piece of the Type 2 Diabetes Puzzle
Research
Jun 09, 2016

A New Piece of the Type 2 Diabetes Puzzle

Diabetes, , diabetes

Research led by Amnon Schlegel, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Utah School of Medicine and an Investigator with the University of Utah Molecular Medicine Program, reveals that defects in how the liver metabolizes glucose, caused by changes in the abundance of the FOXN3 protein, can also trigger increased blood sugar levels, and may explain why some individuals with a variation in the FOXN3 gene show signs of being at risk for diabetes.... Read More

Internal Medicine
Welcoming A New Generation of Native Americans to Medicine and Research
Education, Research
Jun 06, 2016

Welcoming A New Generation of Native Americans to Medicine and Research

mentoring, inclusion, health disparities

With displays of traditional Native American dress and artifacts as reminders of their proud heritage, a group of bright, young students radiated optimism and excitement at the welcome dinner for the Native American Research Internship (NARI), held at the Natural History Museum of Utah. This year, the program is hosting students from 12 tribal nations, 12 states, and 18 universities. While many are newcomers, some have decided to return for their second and even third summers. NARI offers an opportunity for native students to encourage and explore interests in medicine and biomedical research, two fields in which Native Americans are the most underrepresented minority group.... Read More

Pediatrics
Mountain Crane Service Names Pink Machine “Hope” to Build Cancer Awareness
Health Care Transformation, Research, Education, Clinical
Jun 03, 2016

Mountain Crane Service Names Pink Machine “Hope” to Build Cancer Awareness

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Salt Lake City, Utah-based Mountain Crane Service painted a Grove TMS9000E crane pink as a tribute to members of its workforce whose lives have been affected by cancer. The company named the crane “Hope” in honor of crane operator Tyson Allen, who died of cancer in 2012. The pink crane can be seen in the photo assisting in the construction of the Huntsman Cancer Institute in Salt Lake City.... Read More

New WHO Glioma Classification Can 'Optimize Patient Treatment Going Forward'
Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation, Education
Jun 03, 2016

New WHO Glioma Classification Can 'Optimize Patient Treatment Going Forward'

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

The 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) Classification of Infiltrating Gliomas alters diagnostic criteria, providing the basis for clinical trial inclusion or exclusion based on an integrated diagnosis and setting the stage for all future research, according to a summary of 4 posters related to CNS biomarkers presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2016 Annual Meeting.... Read More

Health Care Transformation, Education, Research, Clinical
Jun 03, 2016

New treatment shows promise against hard-to-treat eye cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Eye cancer took the life of author and neurologist Oliver Sacks last year, bringing attention to the rare and deadly disease. Scientists have tried to develop precision treatments against cancers like this one, but the mutations that cause them have proven difficult to block with drugs. Now, a team led by scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, University of Utah School of Medicine, and Navigen, Inc., report a new treatment that shows promise against the hard-to-treat cancer. They found that the mutation relies on a protein, ARF6, to distribute cancer-promoting signals. Further, a drug that blocks ARF6 inhibits eye tumors in mice. The research appears in Cancer Cell online on June 2. Skin-cancer specialists agree. “Clothing is always going to work better than sunscreen because it blocks both UVA and UVB rays,” said Dr. Douglas Grossman, an expert in skin cancer at Huntsman Cancer Institute in Utah. And unlike sunscreens, which we tend to use too sparingly, “it’s not going to wash off.”... Read More

Health Care Transformation, Education, Research, Clinical
Jun 03, 2016

Save your skin with sun-protective clothing

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

The ultimate in sun safety is UV-protective clothing, according to the Canadian Cancer Society. Skin-cancer specialists agree. “Clothing is always going to work better than sunscreen because it blocks both UVA and UVB rays,” said Dr. Douglas Grossman, an expert in skin cancer at Huntsman Cancer Institute in Utah. And unlike sunscreens, which we tend to use too sparingly, “it’s not going to wash off.”... Read More

Oliver Sacks’ Rare Eye Disease Gives Rise to New Strategy for Treating Difficult Cancers
Research
Jun 02, 2016

Oliver Sacks’ Rare Eye Disease Gives Rise to New Strategy for Treating Difficult Cancers

A team led by scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, University of Utah School of Medicine, and Navigen, Inc., report a new treatment that shows promise against the hard-to-treat cancer. They found that the mutation relies on a protein, ARF6, to distribute cancer-promoting signals. Further, a drug that blocks ARF6 inhibits eye tumors in mice. The research appears in Cancer Cell online on June 2.... Read More

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 Does this look strange to you? Spotting suspicious moles with crowd sourcing
Clinical, Education, Health Care Transformation, Research
May 31, 2016

Does this look strange to you? Spotting suspicious moles with crowd sourcing

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Have you ever been convinced to do something by a friend or family member? Maybe it was buying a new car, starting a new exercise routine, or just trying a new dish at a restaurant. Sometimes people need encouragement from a friend or family member to take action, especially when it comes to taking care of their health. A crowd-sourcing application from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) counts on the power of many to encourage people to have suspicious moles checked out for skin cancer.... Read More

Metagenomics Pathogen Detection Tool Could Change How Infectious Diseases Are Diagnosed
Research
May 26, 2016

Metagenomics Pathogen Detection Tool Could Change How Infectious Diseases Are Diagnosed

genome, precision medicine, genetics

Scientists at the University of Utah, ARUP Laboratories, and IDbyDNA, Inc., have developed ultra-fast, meta-genomics analysis software called Taxonomer that dramatically improves the accuracy and speed of pathogen detection. In a paper published today in Genome Biology, the collaborators demonstrated the ability of Taxonomer to analyze the sequences of all nucleic acids in a clinical specimen (DNA and RNA) and to detect pathogens, as well as profile the patient’s gene expression, in a matter of minutes. ... Read More

Pathology,Human Genetics
Brit Accents Vex U.S. Hearing-Impaired Elderly
Research
May 25, 2016

Brit Accents Vex U.S. Hearing-Impaired Elderly

hearing, elderly

Older Americans with some hearing loss shouldn’t feel alone if they have trouble understanding British TV sagas like “Downton Abbey.” A small study from the University of Utah suggests hearing-impaired senior citizens have more trouble than young people comprehending British accents when there is background noise.... Read More

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Families Will Have Fun Exploring the Mysteries of their Biological Blueprints at new Natural History Museum of Utah Exhibit: Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code
Education, Research
May 23, 2016

Families Will Have Fun Exploring the Mysteries of their Biological Blueprints at new Natural History Museum of Utah Exhibit: Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code

– Do you have your mother’s dimples or your father’s red hair? How do we inherit those traits, and how are we connected to all living things? Families will learn the answers to these questions and experience how scientists have unlocked the mysteries of the human genome, at a new traveling exhibit on display at the Natural History Museum of Utah at the Rio Tinto Center.... Read More

Human Genetics
Even Frail, Older Adults Could Benefit From Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction
Research
May 19, 2016

Even Frail, Older Adults Could Benefit From Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction

blood pressure, hypertension

Adults with hypertension who are age 75 years and older, including those who are frail and with poor overall health, could benefit from lowering their blood pressure below current medical guidelines. The multi-institutional investigation was published online in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and presented at the American Geriatrics Society Annual Scientific Meeting on May 19. ... Read More

Internal Medicine
Education, Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation
May 16, 2016

A remedy for cancer information overload

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Have you ever felt like there is so much material on a subject that you can't understand it, let alone make decisions? There's a name for this feelinginformation overload. People receiving a cancer diagnosis often experience information overload. Donna Branson, director of Patient and Public Education at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI), explains, "If you Google the term breast cancer, you may get 44 million hits. It's confusing, and not all of the information out there is credible."... Read More

Salt Lake County names diversity affairs director
Research, Health Care Transformation, Education, Clinical
May 16, 2016

Salt Lake County names diversity affairs director

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Emma Houston is the new director of diversity affairs for Salt Lake County. A longtime community volunteer, Houston was been on the county's Council on Diversity Affairs since 2013. She is a former chairwoman of the Governor's Office of Ethnic Affairs along with serving on the boards of the Huntsman Cancer Foundation and the National Council on Aging.... Read More

Mole Crowdsourcing:  A New Way to Find Deadly Skin Cancer
Research, Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Education
May 13, 2016

Mole Crowdsourcing: A New Way to Find Deadly Skin Cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Melanoma is the most deadly of all skin cancers. If melanoma is found early, it is easier to treat. Researchers at the University of Utah and Texas Tech University have identified a new approach for finding suspicious moles that could be melanoma: mole crowdsourcing. Crowdsourcing refers to using crowds of people, often recruited online, to accomplish tasks. An individual performing a skin self-exam can miss about half of melanomas. But with mole crowdsourcing, one example showed if at least 19 out of 100 people think a mole is suspicious, then a doctor should examine it. Researchers are developing a cell phone application that will allow people to take a photo of a mole and have that image evaluated by other users. Learn more in The Scope Radio podcast about mole crowdsourcing, or about our Melanoma Program and the services it offers to diagnose and treat this disease.... Read More

Feeling Cancer Information Overload? Call or visit our Cancer Learning Center
Health Care Transformation, Research, Education, Clinical
May 13, 2016

Feeling Cancer Information Overload? Call or visit our Cancer Learning Center

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

With so much information about cancer that is readily available, those impacted by a cancer diagnosis often experience a feeling of information overload. The Cancer Learning Center (CLC) at HCI provides a welcoming environment where patients, families, and the general public can get answers to their questions about cancer. Trained health educators help visitors and callers navigate the potential for information overload and provide current, accurate information about treatment, side effects, and coping strategies. This resource is free for anyone with questions about cancer. Learn more about the G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center and how it began in our 2010 Annual Report, and other Education and Outreach programs at HCI.... Read More

Study Finds COPD-like Respiratory Symptoms Common Among Smokers Despite Lack of COPD Diagnosis
Research
May 12, 2016

Study Finds COPD-like Respiratory Symptoms Common Among Smokers Despite Lack of COPD Diagnosis

copd

In a finding that could lead to better treatment of smoking-related lung diseases, scientists are reporting that about half of current or former smokers with normal lung function have respiratory symptoms similar to COPD and an increased risk for exacerbations or “flare ups” of their symptoms despite a lack of COPD diagnosis. Many of these individuals show COPD-like symptoms, such as shortness of breath and difficulty exercising. Researchers note they also have a high rate of respiratory medication use despite a lack of data from clinical trials about appropriate treatment of this particular patient population. ... Read More

Internal Medicine
U.S. Olympic Committee Adds the University of Utah to  National Medical Network to Support Elite U.S. Athletes
Research, Recognition, Clinical
May 11, 2016

U.S. Olympic Committee Adds the University of Utah to National Medical Network to Support Elite U.S. Athletes

The United States Olympic Committee Today Announced the Addition of the University of Utah Health Care (UUHC) to the National Medical Network. UUHC Will Serve as a National Medical Center, Specializing in Orthopedic Medicine, Physical Medicine, Primary Care, Dentistry, psychiatry, ophthalmology and neurosurgery for elite U.S. athletes. The partnership will also include collaborative research and educational opportunities for athletes at the University of Utah. ... Read More

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Research, Health Care Transformation, Education, Clinical
May 09, 2016

Salt Lake Bees to ‘Pack the Park Pink’ Saturday night

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

When the Salt Lake Bees take the field on Saturday, May 7 they will be playing for the name on the front and the back of their jersey. The Bees teamed up with Huntsman Cancer Foundation (HCF) to allow donors to pick the names on the back of the on-field jerseys for the team's 10th annual "Pack the Park Pink Night" at Smith's Ballpark on Saturday, May 7.... Read More

Health Care Transformation, Education, Clinical, Research
May 09, 2016

National stereotactic radiosurgery patient registry gains momentum

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Brainlab announced that it has enrolled 11 of the expected 30 hospitals and healthcare systems in the national Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) Patient Registry. Launched in partnership with The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) and the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the patient registry will gather important patient data, aiming to define national patterns of care in radiosurgery. The registry will have an eye to improving healthcare outcomes, supporting informed decision-making and potentially lowering the cost of care for patients.... Read More

Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation, Education
May 09, 2016

Study contradicts belief that cancer protects against Alzheimer’s

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Despite studies that claim people with cancer are less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease--raising the possibility that what triggers cancer also prevents the neurodegenerative disorder--a new investigation finds a more somber explanation. Many cancer patients don't live long enough to get Alzheimer's. The research, led by investigators at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, was published in The Journals of Gerontology: Series B. ... Read More

 Last performing Ringling Bros. elephants arrive at retirement home
Research, Education, Health Care Transformation, Clinical
May 09, 2016

Last performing Ringling Bros. elephants arrive at retirement home

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Elephants at their new Polk City home The Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus' 11 remaining Asian elephants, after final May 1 performances in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and Providence, R.I., arrived last Thursday at Ringling's Center for Elephant Conservation in Polk City. The elephants joined Ringling's herd of 29 to live out their days.... Read More

Study Contradicts Belief that Cancer Protects Against Alzheimer’s
Research
May 05, 2016

Study Contradicts Belief that Cancer Protects Against Alzheimer’s

cancer, alzheimer's

Despite studies that claim people with cancer are less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease--raising the possibility that what triggers cancer also prevents the neurodegenerative disorder--a new investigation finds a more somber explanation. Many cancer patients don’t live long enough to get Alzheimer’s. The research, led by investigators at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, was published in The Journals of Gerontology: Series B.... Read More

Family and Preventive Medicine
Study Contradicts Belief that Cancer Protects against Alzheimer’s
Research, Health Care Transformation, Education
May 05, 2016

Study Contradicts Belief that Cancer Protects against Alzheimer’s

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Despite studies that claim people with cancer are less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease—raising the possibility that what triggers cancer also prevents the neurodegenerative disorder—a new investigation finds a more somber explanation. Many cancer patients don’t live long enough to get Alzheimer’s. The research, led by investigators at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, was published in The Journals of Gerontology: Series B.... Read More

Precision Prevention with Genetic Counseling
Education, Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation
Apr 22, 2016

Precision Prevention with Genetic Counseling

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Actress Angelina Jolie-Pitt made headlines when she went public with a decision to have a preventative double mastectomy and later surgery to remove her ovaries as well. Jolie-Pitt made these decisions because test results revealed she has a genetic mutation that significantly raises her risk of breast and ovarian cancer. This drew important attention to understanding inherited cancer risk – part of ongoing genetic research at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI).... Read More

It Takes Teamwork to Treat Cancer
Education, Health Care Transformation, Research, Clinical
Apr 08, 2016

It Takes Teamwork to Treat Cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Teamwork is the focus of HCI’s tumor boards, monthly meetings where all the specialists involved in treating a given type of cancer share their expertise to come up with a treatment plan for a patient. This exchange means every patient receives the best care, aiming not only for survival but the highest quality of life possible. Dan HedlundTogether a team of doctors, social workers, and investigative researchers create a plan to treat an individual’s cancer with a combination of therapies. Learn how one patient, Dan Hedlund, is now cancer-free after undergoing treatment through HCI’s sarcoma multidisciplinary team.... Read More

Cell Therapy May Mend Damaged Hearts, Study Says
Research
Apr 04, 2016

Cell Therapy May Mend Damaged Hearts, Study Says

heart failure, heart

End-stage heart failure patients treated with stem cells harvested from their own bone marrow experienced 37 percent fewer cardiac events - including deaths and hospital admissions related to heart failure - than a placebo-controlled group, reports a new study. Results from ixCELL-DCM, the largest cell therapy trial for treating heart failure to date, will be presented at the 2016 American College of Cardiology Scientific Session and published online in The Lancet on April 4.... Read More

Internal Medicine
Huntsman Cancer Institute CEO to Join Federal Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel
Education, Research, Health Care Transformation,
Apr 04, 2016

Huntsman Cancer Institute CEO to Join Federal Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel

Huntsman Cancer Institute, beckerle

Huntsman Cancer Institute’s CEO and director, Mary Beckerle, PhD, has been asked to join Vice President Joe Biden’s Moonshot Program Initiative as an invited member of a new Blue Ribbon Panel, tasked with advising the National Cancer Advisory Board (NCAB) on the scientific opportunities available to accelerate progress against cancer and evaluate potential new investments in cancer research.... Read More

Plan Ahead with Advance Care Directives
Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation, Education
Apr 01, 2016

Plan Ahead with Advance Care Directives

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

No one plans on having a medical emergency, but if one happens, an advance directive outlines your plans and wishes for medical care. It tells your doctor and your family what decisions to make on your behalf, if you are unable to speak for yourself. An advance directive is also called a living will. Even if you’re young and healthy, you can prepare for unforeseeable events with an advance directive. The forms for an advance directive vary by state, but most follow the same basic format. Learn more about advance directives and Utah advance health care directive forms and instructions from the University of Utah’s Center on Aging. ... Read More

Catalyzing Advances in Diabetes, Metabolism, and Obesity Research
Research
Mar 28, 2016

Catalyzing Advances in Diabetes, Metabolism, and Obesity Research

Diabetes, , diabetes, obesity

The University of Utah’s Diabetes and Metabolism Center (DMC) has awarded grants to seven projects designed to advance research and practices to improve outcomes for those impacted by diabetes, metabolic abnormalities, and obesity. This year’s recipients come from nine departments at the University of Utah School of Medicine, College of Humanities, and College of Science, and draw from a wide variety of related disciplines.... Read More

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Research
Mar 25, 2016

New Treatment Reduces Precancerous Polyps in Hereditary Cancer Patients

Inheriting a mutation in the APC gene leads to a nearly 100% lifetime risk of colorectal cancer. While colon cancer can be kept at bay by removing the large intestine, these patients also have up to a 15% risk of getting cancer in the small intestine, which is the leading cause of cancer death in this patient group. A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), has identified the first prevention treatment for these patients, a two-drug combination that significantly reduces the number and size of precancerous polyps in the small intestine. ... Read More

Internal Medicine,Oncological Sciences
Pulitzer Prize Winning Author Dr. Sid Mukherjee Joins HCI Panel Discussion
Education, Health Care Transformation, Research
Mar 22, 2016

Pulitzer Prize Winning Author Dr. Sid Mukherjee Joins HCI Panel Discussion

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

There are limits to precision medicine – the genome-mapping wave permeating health care these days. And no one is more aware of the gap between technology and science than cancer doctors. A panel gathered at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) March 23 warned about the boundaries, even the dangers, of relying too much on “big data” to treat patients with uniquely variable diseases.... Read More

New Treatment Reduces Precancerous Polyps in Hereditary Cancer Patients
Education, Research, Health Care Transformation
Mar 22, 2016

New Treatment Reduces Precancerous Polyps in Hereditary Cancer Patients

Huntsman Cancer Institute, colon cancer, cancer prevention, cancer genetics

Inheriting a mutation in the APC gene leads to a nearly 100% lifetime risk of colorectal cancer. While colon cancer can be kept at bay by removing the large intestine, these patients also have up to a 15% risk of getting cancer in the small intestine, which is the leading cause of cancer death in this patient group. A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), has identified the first prevention treatment for these patients, a two-drug combination that significantly reduces the number and size of precancerous polyps in the small intestine.... Read More

Huntsman 140 Cycling Event Raises Funds for Cancer Research at Huntsman Cancer Institute
Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Education, Research
Mar 18, 2016

Huntsman 140 Cycling Event Raises Funds for Cancer Research at Huntsman Cancer Institute

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

The Huntsman 140 is a fundraising road cycling event on Saturday, June 18 in Salt Lake City, Utah. All funds raised through this one-day event go to Huntsman Cancer Foundation (HCF) to support cancer research at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI). Each rider is encouraged to fundraise $500 to support cancer research at HCI. This ride is ideal for cyclists of all levels--from avid riders taking on the 140-mile challenge to newer pedalers enjoying the rolling 25-mile course. The variety of courses include 25-, 50-, 75-, and 140-mile routes.... Read More

Within Six Families, a Path to Personalized Treatment for an Immune Disorder
Research
Mar 16, 2016

Within Six Families, a Path to Personalized Treatment for an Immune Disorder

Internal Medicine, , immunology, precision medicine, genetics

By age 56, Roma Jean Ockler had endured 17 years of recurring infections and a life-threatening intestinal illness before finally receiving the right treatment for her condition. Her family’s genetic information was combined with that of five other families from across the world to classify a new immune disorder. The finding makes possible diagnosis at a young age so that doctors can intervene early and give the right treatment from the start.... Read More

Pathology
Hidden in Plain Sight: Well-Known Drug Could Yield New Treatment for Herpes Viruses
Research
Mar 14, 2016

Hidden in Plain Sight: Well-Known Drug Could Yield New Treatment for Herpes Viruses

infectious disease, herpes

University of Utah School of Medicine researchers have unexpectedly found that a drug that has been used for the past 50 years to treat heart failure and high blood pressure also inhibits infection by the Epstein Barr virus, which causes mono and is associated with several cancers. The finding has broad implications: with modification, the drug could be used to treat other illness caused by this class of virus including shingles, mono, and herpes. ... Read More

Internal Medicine
Cancer of Unknown Primary studied at Huntsman Cancer Institute
Health Care Transformation, Research, Education, Clinical
Mar 11, 2016

Cancer of Unknown Primary studied at Huntsman Cancer Institute

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Cancer of unknown primary is a rare disease (3-5% of individuals diagnosed with cancer are diagnosed with a cancer of unknown primary) in which cancer cells have spread in the body but the place the cancer began is unknown. There are a number of reasons why the primary cancer may not be found. The primary tumor may be too small to find, or the body’s immune system may have already destroyed it. It’s also possible that the primary tumor was removed during surgery for another condition and doctors didn’t know the cancer was there. Cancer has a language all its own and it’s that much harder if English is not your first language. That’s where Guadalupe Tovar, a health educator and patient navigator at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI), comes in. She helps Hispanic families navigate their cancer care.... Read More

University of Utah Infectious Disease Expert to Lead U.S. Olympic Committee Infectious Disease Advisory Group
Clinical, Research, Recognition
Mar 04, 2016

University of Utah Infectious Disease Expert to Lead U.S. Olympic Committee Infectious Disease Advisory Group

infectious disease, zika, pediatrics

The United States Olympic Committee today announced the formation of an Infectious Disease Advisory Group to be chaired by Carrie L. Byington, M.D., professor of pediatrics and infectious disease specialist at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Byington will be joined on the advisory group by Randy Taplitz, M.D., from the University of California, San Diego, and Capt. Martin S. Cetron, M.D., from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.... Read More

Pediatrics
Vice President Joe Biden Tours Huntsman Cancer Institute
Education, Research, Health Care Transformation, Clinical
Mar 04, 2016

Vice President Joe Biden Tours Huntsman Cancer Institute

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Vice President Joe Biden already was thinking about ways to share “big data” across disciplines, hospital systems and state borders in his quest to defeat cancer. But a five-volume gift of his family’s genealogy from leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, a crash course in the Utah Population Database and a round table discussion with cancer researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) Friday clinched it.... Read More

Ancient Viral Invaders in Our DNA Help Fight Today’s Infections
Research
Mar 03, 2016

Ancient Viral Invaders in Our DNA Help Fight Today’s Infections

infectious disease, genetics

About eight percent of our DNA is viral in origin: remnants of ancient battles between infectious viruses and our ancestors. A new study published in Science by scientists at the University of Utah School of Medicine shows that evolution has repurposed some of these viral remains into weapons against its own kind. They find that bits of viral DNA embedded in our genome are regulating genes that are integral to our innate immune system.... Read More

Internal Medicine
Huntsman Cancer Institute Hosts Vice President Joe Biden
Health Care Transformation, Education, Research
Feb 29, 2016

Huntsman Cancer Institute Hosts Vice President Joe Biden

Huntsman Cancer Institute, beckerle

(February 26, 2016) – Today Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) hosted Vice President Joe Biden as a part of the White House administration’s “moonshot” initiative to double the rate of progress toward curing cancer. During his visit, the vice president toured the facility, was given an inside look at the Utah Population Database and participated in a roundtable discussion comprised of Huntsman Cancer Foundation board chairman Jon Huntsman Jr., CEO and director of HCI Dr. Mary Beckerle and Senator Orrin Hatch. Local cancer survivors and physicians, researchers and experts in the field also participated in the roundtable.... Read More

University of Utah Biochemist Is 1 of 4 Researchers Globally to Receive JDRF Grants to Develop ‘Smart’ Glucose-Responsive Insulin
Recognition, Research
Feb 25, 2016

University of Utah Biochemist Is 1 of 4 Researchers Globally to Receive JDRF Grants to Develop ‘Smart’ Glucose-Responsive Insulin

diabetes, type 1 diabetes

University of Utah biochemist Danny Chou, Ph.D., is one of four researchers worldwide to receive a grant from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) and the pharmaceutical company Sanofi US Services Inc. to develop glucose-responsive insulin to help millions of people with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) maintain proper blood glucose levels. ... Read More

Biochemistry
White House Highlights University of Utah-led Project to Help Patients with Rare, Untreatable Diseases at Precision Medicine Summit
Recognition, Research
Feb 25, 2016

White House Highlights University of Utah-led Project to Help Patients with Rare, Untreatable Diseases at Precision Medicine Summit

precision medicine, personalized medicine, rare disease

A University of Utah-led initiative to help people with rare and untreatable diseases was highlighted by the White House at the Precision Medicine Initiative Summit today. Patient Empowered Precision Medicine Alliance (PEPMA) will lay the groundwork for a pipeline that rapidly matches patients with rare diseases that are untreatable with current therapies to the right drugs for their condition, at a relatively low cost.... Read More

Internal Medicine
What Are the Benefits and Harms of Cancer Screening? Most Guidelines Don’t Tell You
Research
Feb 24, 2016

What Are the Benefits and Harms of Cancer Screening? Most Guidelines Don’t Tell You

Huntsman Cancer Institute, , cancer screening, breast cancer

With three sets of breast cancer screening guidelines giving conflicting sets of recommendations, it’s no wonder that patients and physicians are confused. A new study shows that adding to the confusion are the guidelines themselves. More often than not, cancer screening guidelines either leave out important information about the benefits, or harms, of certain recommendations, or presents information in a biased way.... Read More

Population Health Sciences
Five for the Fight
Health Care Transformation, Education, Research
Feb 17, 2016

Five for the Fight

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

A Utah research company has teamed up with the Huntsman Cancer Foundation in an effort to raise funds and awareness for cancer research. Today, Provo-based Qualtrics announced a new campaign, Five for the Fight, which invites everyone around the globe to give $5 to the fight against cancer and to challenge five others to do the same.... Read More

World of Heart Recovery Medicine to Focus on Latest Advances at U of U Symposium
Research
Jan 07, 2016

World of Heart Recovery Medicine to Focus on Latest Advances at U of U Symposium

Cardiovascular Center, , heart failure, heart, ucars

On Jan. 14-15, the University of Utah School of Medicine will become the worldwide focus of heart recovery medicine when leading scientists and clinicians from across the globe come to Salt Lake City for the Utah Cardiac Recovery Symposium (U-CARS). Now in its fourth year, the one-of-a-kind conference has been described as a “think tank” where hundreds of cardiologists, surgeons, radiologists, anesthesiologists, ER physicians, nurses, pharmacists, research scientists and more converge to push forward the field of heart recovery. ... Read More

Internal Medicine
We’re Keeping Our New Year’s Resolution: Better Health Care for All
Education, Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Research
Dec 28, 2015

We’re Keeping Our New Year’s Resolution: Better Health Care for All

What does excellent health care look like? It’s a question on the mind of every health industry leader in this country, and it’s a question of value. For all that we spend on health care in the U.S., what do we get in return? Are we getting our money’s worth? At University of Utah Health Sciences, I’m proud to say, the answer is yes. ... Read More

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Wired for Gaming: Brain Differences Found in Compulsive Video Game Players
Research
Dec 21, 2015

Wired for Gaming: Brain Differences Found in Compulsive Video Game Players

addiction

SALT LAKE CITY - Brain scans from nearly 200 adolescent boys provide evidence that the brains of compulsive video game players are wired differently. Chronic video game play is associated with hyperconnectivity between several pairs of brain networks. Some of the changes are predicted to help game players respond to new information. Other changes are associated with distractibility and poor impulse control. The research, a collaboration between the University of Utah School of Medicine, and Chung-Ang University in South Korea, was published online in Addiction Biology on Dec. 22, 2015. ... Read More

Radiology
Meaningful Mentoring Makes A Difference
Research, Health Care Transformation
Dec 17, 2015

Meaningful Mentoring Makes A Difference

Diversity fuels innovation. I’ve written about this before—about how creative solutions to big problems requires a diversity of thought and perspective. Today, I’ve invited our associate vice president for faculty and academic affairs Carrie Byington, M.D., to explain a mentoring program that is making campus a better, more inclusive place to learn, work and innovate while helping to solve the physician-scientist shortage.... Read More

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When Cancer of Unknown Origin Strikes, Family Members Are At Increased Risk
Research
Dec 17, 2015

When Cancer of Unknown Origin Strikes, Family Members Are At Increased Risk

Huntsman Cancer Institute, cancer, genetics

Cancer usually begins in one location and then spreads, but in 3-5% of cancer patients, the tissue where a cancer began is unknown. In these individuals a cancer diagnosis is made because it has metastasized to other sites. Patients with these so-called “cancers of unknown primary,” or CUP, have a very poor prognosis, with a median survival of three months. A new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Oncology finds that family members of CUP patients are at higher risk of developing CUP themselves, as well as cancers of the lung, pancreas, colon, and some cancers of the blood.... Read More

Can we Afford Precision Medicine?
Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Research
Dec 04, 2015

Can we Afford Precision Medicine?

Don't expect precision medicine to bring relief from soaring health care costs. Genetically targeting therapies to those patients most likely to benefit spares them the time and toxicity of trying ineffective drugs. That’s a good thing for patients, and in theory, a money-saver. But the economics of drug discovery suggest otherwise.... Read More

The Promise and Peril of Genome-Wide Association Studies
Health Care Transformation, Research, Clinical
Dec 03, 2015

The Promise and Peril of Genome-Wide Association Studies

Michael Boehnke, Ph.D. has spent two decades searching for the genetic roots of type 2 diabetes, which affects more than 300 million individuals worldwide and accounts for 10 percent of U.S. health care costs. Progress may seem slow, but today, we know of more than 100 common markers for type 2 diabetes and more than 60 for glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, he says.... Read More

The Path to Precision Medicine will be Paved in Diagnostics
Research, Health Care Transformation
Dec 03, 2015

The Path to Precision Medicine will be Paved in Diagnostics

Diagnostics are “the gateway” to precision medicine. They are “absolutely critical,” and it’s critical that the science behind them be “precise, accurate and actionable,” emphasized Dean Li, M.D., Ph.D., at a University of Utah-sponsored “Frontiers in Precision Medicine” conference this month. ... Read More

A Molecular Noose Caught in the Act
Research
Dec 03, 2015

A Molecular Noose Caught in the Act

One of the most fundamental challenges that a cell faces is how to bring membranes that are far apart, close together. New research in Science shows how cellular machinery, called ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport), accomplishes this essential task. ... Read More

Biochemistry
Health Care Transformation, Research
Dec 03, 2015

Your Genome Guardian, Elephants and Outwitting Childhood Cancer

Cancer is the leading cause of disease-related death in children, and “10 to 30 percent of such cases are related to a genetic risk”—a cruel fate that can make families feel helpless, says pediatric oncologist Joshua Schiffman, M.D. But it’s in the genetics where hope gets a foothold.... Read More

Advances in Precision Medicine and Translational Research: PPH and CCTS Pilot Award Symposium
Education, Research
Nov 19, 2015

Advances in Precision Medicine and Translational Research: PPH and CCTS Pilot Award Symposium

precision medicine, personalized heatlh

On December 2, 2015, lead investigators of interdisciplinary teams will present their research toward advancing customized healthcare. Each team is recipient of a seed grant from University of Utah’s Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS) and Program in Personalized Health pilot program designed to combine talent, resources, and perspectives from across disciplines in order to spur translational research related to personalized health. ... Read More

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Possible New Mechanism for Aspirin’s Role in Cancer Prevention
Education, Health Care Transformation, Research
Nov 19, 2015

Possible New Mechanism for Aspirin’s Role in Cancer Prevention

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Aspirin has been shown to decrease the risk of colorectal cancer and possibly other cancers. However, the risk of side effects, including in some cases severe gastrointestinal bleeding, makes it necessary to better understand the mechanisms by which aspirin acts at low doses before recommending it more generally as a preventative, says Cornelia Ulrich, PhD, Senior Director of Population Sciences at Huntsman Cancer Institute in Salt Lake City.... Read More

Research
Nov 12, 2015

ER visits, hospitalizations decline in elderly patients evaluated by DNA testing and predictive medication analytics system

precision medicine, pharmacogenetics, pharmacy

YouScript predictive medication analytics, a clinical decision support tool used by doctors to guide genetic testing and improve drug treatments, has been shown to cut ER visits by almost three-quarters and reduce hospitalizations by more than one-third in elderly patients taking multiple medications. Researchers from the University of Utah compared those who received YouScript-guided genetic testing and analysis in a prospective group to those who did not in a matched retrospective cohort. YouScript was shown to reduce ER visits by 71 percent and hospitalizations by 39 percent in the tested population compared to the statistically matched group.... Read More

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Research, Education
Nov 09, 2015

Key Findings from 2015 AAMC Public Opinion Research

Every few years, the AAMC publishes results from research assessing public perception of medical schools and academic medical centers. The 2015 research recently concluded. Bill McInturff, co-founder of Public Opinion Strategies (POS), presented a summary of the findings at the AAMC’s Learn · Serve · Lead conference in Baltimore.... Read More

How Low to Go for Blood Pressure? Lower Target Could Affect Millions of Americans
Research
Nov 09, 2015

How Low to Go for Blood Pressure? Lower Target Could Affect Millions of Americans

heart, high blood pressure

A new study finds that at least 16.8 million Americans could potentially benefit from lowering their systolic blood pressure (SBP) to 120 mmHg, much lower than current guidelines of 140 or 150 mmHg. The collaborative investigation between the University of Utah, University of Alabama at Birmingham, and Columbia University, will be published Nov. 9 online in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC).... Read More

Population Health Sciences
Study Shows Benefits of Intensive Blood Pressure Management
Research, Clinical
Nov 09, 2015

Study Shows Benefits of Intensive Blood Pressure Management

Internal Medicine, , heart, high blood pressure

Patients whose blood pressure target was lowered to reach a systolic goal of less than 120 mmHg had their risk for heart attack, heart failure or stroke reduced by 24 percent, and their risk for death lowered by 27 percent. Compared to a systolic blood pressure goal of less than 140 mmHg, aggressive treatment appeared to be as effective for elderly participants as for adults age 50-74, according to results from the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) presented at the American Heart Association meeting and published online in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) on Nov. 9. ... Read More

Internal Medicine
Health Care Transformation, Research, Education, Clinical
Nov 08, 2015

Payment Reform: From Distant Dream to Hard Reality

Payers and providers are fast adopting new ways of paying for care and shedding fee-for-service constraints to doing what they’ve long known to be in the best interest of patients. It's not easy, but it's a trend that's here to stay.... Read More

Women in Medicine: Cultivating a Healthy Disrespect for the Impossible
Research, Education, Health Care Transformation, Clinical
Nov 05, 2015

Women in Medicine: Cultivating a Healthy Disrespect for the Impossible

innovation, education, research, diversity

University of Utah pediatrician and Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs Carrie Byington, M.D. reflects on her career path and the obstacles she overcame as a Mexican-American woman growing up in south Texas with no physician role models. “It’s not about success. There are successes and those are great. There are failures and those are hard,” she confides. “It’s about how you spend your time. In the amount of time you have here, how are you going spend it, how are you going to make a difference?”... Read More

Smashing Stereotypes: TED profiles ‘12 Badass’ Scientists
Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Research
Oct 22, 2015

Smashing Stereotypes: TED profiles ‘12 Badass’ Scientists

diversity, research, women in science, women in medicine

Astrophysicist, biologist, computer scientist, genetic virologist, glaciologist, molecular animator—what do you imagine when you hear these words? “What do you see when you picture a scientist?” asks TED writer Karen Eng in a provocatively titled article, “12 badass scientists…who also happen to be women.” ... Read More

Crash Risk: Study Highlights Lifestyle, Occupational Factors That May Put Truck Drivers in Danger
Research
Oct 21, 2015

Crash Risk: Study Highlights Lifestyle, Occupational Factors That May Put Truck Drivers in Danger

occupational safety

Truck drivers who are frequently fatigued after work, use cell phones while driving, or have an elevated pulse pressure – a potential predictor of cardiovascular disease - may be at increased risk for getting into truck accidents, according to a study by the Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health (RMCOEH) at the University of Utah School of Medicine and published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (JOEM). ... Read More

Family and Preventive Medicine
Punching Holes in Health Care’s Glass Ceiling
Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Research, Education
Oct 21, 2015

Punching Holes in Health Care’s Glass Ceiling

No one wants to admit their biases. We’d all like to believe that we’re blind to gender, race and ethnicity. I challenge you, though, to look at these photos and then ask yourself: Are these the images that first come to mind when you hear the words “CEO,” “surgeon,” or “scientist?”... Read More

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Research
Oct 20, 2015

Building Immune System Memory

immune system, vaccine

A study led by the University of Utah School of Medicine has identified molecular mechanisms that control an immune cell’s ability to remember. They found that in helper T cells, the proteins Oct1 and OCA-B work together to put immune response genes on standby so that they are easily activated when the body is re-exposed to a pathogen. The research, which could inform strategies for developing better vaccines, was performed in collaboration with scientists from The Broad Institute and University of Michigan, and published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine.... Read More

Pathology
The One Thing
Education, Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Research
Oct 13, 2015

The One Thing

Recently I was asked by a recruit, “What’s the ‘one thing’ you are trying to achieve for the University of Utah Health Sciences?” I suppose he was alluding to the book by Gary Keller, which has been very popular of late among the business set.... Read More

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Why Elephants Rarely Get Cancer
Research
Oct 08, 2015

Why Elephants Rarely Get Cancer

cancer, cancer resistance

A study led by the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah could explain why elephants rarely get cancer. Published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), the results show that elephants have extra modified copies of a gene encoding a well known cancer inhibitor, p53. The elephants may also have a more robust mechanism for killing damaged cells that are at risk for becoming cancerous. The findings suggest extra p53 could explain elephants’ enhanced cancer resistance and lead to new strategies for treating cancer in people. Pediatric oncologist Joshua Schiffman, who led the study, describes the research and what it could mean for treating cancer in people.... Read More

Oncological Sciences
Why Elephants Rarely Get Cancer
Health Care Transformation, Research, Education
Oct 08, 2015

Why Elephants Rarely Get Cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Why elephants rarely get cancer is a mystery that has stumped scientists for decades. A study led by researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah and Arizona State University, and including researchers from the Ringling Bros. Center for Elephant Conservation, may have found the answer.... Read More

Research
Oct 05, 2015

University of Utah Joins CDC in Effort to Stop Spread of Ebola, MRSA and Other Infectious Diseases in Health Care Settings

In its effort to develop and implement strategies to stop the spread of infectious diseases, including Ebola, in health care settings, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has chosen the University of Utah and five other institutions nationwide to partner with the agency to spur innovations that help control the transmission of such organisms.... Read More

Internal Medicine
Research, Clinical, Health Care Transformation
Sep 28, 2015

Changing the Research Paradigm: Utah Scientists Launch Patient-Powered Air Pollution and Asthma Tracking Study

research, patients

Academic research can be a solitary pursuit, cloistered in clinics and labs physically—and intellectually—distant from patients. But what if the patients themselves worked the science? Helped test the equipment and trouble-shoot the computer interface? What if they “broke” things and helped with the “fix”? ... Read More

Research, Clinical, Health Care Transformation
Sep 26, 2015

Escaping 'Undiagnosed Island'

Not actionable. Matt and Cristina Might would like to see those words stricken from medicine’s vernacular. To parents of children with ill-defined diseases, those words are disempowering, signaling another dead end in the search for a diagnosis and treatment. They're also misleading, says Matt Might, Ph.D., University of Utah associate professor of computer science and adviser to President Obama’s precision medicine initiative. Because in the absence of actionable knowledge, treatments or cures, “science becomes medicine,” he says. ... Read More

Why Do So Many Children Born With Heart Defects Have Trouble in School?
Research, Recognition
Aug 23, 2015

Why Do So Many Children Born With Heart Defects Have Trouble in School?

cardiology, pediatrics, genetics

As advances in medicine are giving rise to growing numbers of children who survive severe heart defects, it’s emerging that over half have behavioral problems and difficulty keeping up academically. The University of Utah School of Medicine was awarded $6.4 million from the National Institutes of Health to identify causes of these disabilities, focusing on a search for genetic lesions that affect both the heart and brain. The goal is to be able to predict patient outcomes from genetic data, so that health care providers can intervene early.... Read More

Pediatrics
Viruses Thrive In Big Families, In Sickness and In Health
Research
Aug 04, 2015

Viruses Thrive In Big Families, In Sickness and In Health

cold and flu, infectious disease, children's health

A study led by the University of Utah School of Medicine finds that every child puts a household at increased risk for viral infections. Childless households had infections during 3-4 weeks of the year, while families with six children were infected for 45 weeks. But only half who tested positive reported feeling ill. Published in Clinical Infectious Diseases, the results can help families and health care providers know when illness should be cause for concern.... Read More

Pediatrics
Genetic Tug of War in the Brain Influences Behavior
Research
Jul 30, 2015

Genetic Tug of War in the Brain Influences Behavior

behavior

Researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine report on a version of genetic parental control in mice that is more targeted, and subtle than canonical imprinting. Published in Cell Reports, so-called noncanonical imprinting is particularly prevalent in the brain, and skews the genetic message in subpopulations of cells so that mom, or dad, has a stronger say. The mechanism can influence offspring behavior, and because it is observed more frequently than classic imprinting, appears to be preferred. ... Read More

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Clinical, Research
Jul 27, 2015

Stem Cell Delivery Method Shows Promise for Treating End Stage Heart Failure

stem cells, heart, cardiovascular, ustart

A new clinical trial to test how a high dose of stem cells delivered via a method called “retrograde coronary sinus infusion” affects end stage heart failure patients is showing promising results. The trial, conducted by an international team led by researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT appears in the current issue of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine. ... Read More

Internal Medicine
Research
Jul 22, 2015

Poor Survival in Multiple Myeloma Patients Linked to Genetic Variation

Huntsman Cancer Institute, , multiple myeloma, cancer, pecision medicine

Researchers have found that multiple myeloma patients with a genetic variation in the gene FOPNL die on average 1-3 years sooner than patients without it. The finding was identified with a genetic mapping technique, genome wide association studies (GWAS), and verified in patient populations from North America and Europe. Published in Nature Communications, this was the first study to survey the entire human genome for genetic variation influencing survival, and is a first step toward applying precision medicine to multiple myeloma.... Read More

Biomedical Informatics,Internal Medicine
Health Care Providers A Major Contributor to Problem of Antibiotic Overuse
Research
Jul 20, 2015

Health Care Providers A Major Contributor to Problem of Antibiotic Overuse

antibiotic-resistance

A study suggests that differences in the routines of individual providers drives variation in antibiotic prescribing more than differences in patient characteristics, standards of practice at different hospitals, or clinical settings (emergency department, primary care, urgent care). The report, led by the Veterans Affairs Salt Lake City Health Care System and the University of Utah and published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, is an important step toward understanding the problem of antibiotic overuse, a major public health concern given the rise in antibiotic-resistant “superbugs”.... Read More

Internal Medicine
Genetic Testing in Kids is Fraught with Complications
Clinical, Research
Jul 02, 2015

Genetic Testing in Kids is Fraught with Complications

ethics, genetic testing

Despite an increasing ease in acquiring genetic information, the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) points out that doing so has consequences, particularly when it comes to children. It is this population, they say, that is the most vulnerable. With this precaution in mind, the ASHG Workgroup on Pediatric Genetic and Genomic Testing has issued guidelines for genetic testing in children and adolescents that are based on a thorough review of studies on ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI). The recommendations were published in The American Journal of Human Genetics. ... Read More

Internal Medicine
Patients Less Likely to Die if Readmitted to Same Hospital
Research, Clinical
Jun 17, 2015

Patients Less Likely to Die if Readmitted to Same Hospital

Surgical Services, , surgery, medical tourism

Up to 22 percent of surgical patients experience unexpected complications and must be readmitted for post-operative care. A study led by the University of Utah suggests that returning to the same hospital is important for recovery. Readmission to a different hospital was associated with a 26 percent increased risk for dying within 90 days. The results, published in The Lancet, have implications for patients who take part in domestic medical tourism programs. ... Read More

Surgery
Genomics England Selects Omicia and University of Utah Technology for 100,000 Genomes Project
Research, Recognition
Jun 11, 2015

Genomics England Selects Omicia and University of Utah Technology for 100,000 Genomes Project

precision medicine, genomics

Genomics England announced that it will be using technology co-developed in a partnership between the University of Utah and Omicia to interpret the DNA of Britons as part of the 100,000 Genomes Project, a national effort to hasten creation of diagnostics and treatments that are tailored to a person’s genetic make-up. The VAAST (Variant Annotation, Analysis and Search Tool) and Phevor (Phenotype Driven Variant Ontological Re-ranking tool) algorithms are core components of the Omicia Opal platform, which transforms genomic data into clinically relevant information.... Read More

Human Genetics
On the Importance of Marrying Science with Compassion
Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Research, Education
May 31, 2015

On the Importance of Marrying Science with Compassion

At a time when the nation is so singularly focused on the business of health care –– on getting lean, bending the cost curve, and treating patients as consumers –– it can feel as if medicine has strayed from its roots, its raison d'être. Why, then, as I reflect on the challenges and opportunities facing our graduating Class of 2015, I am filled with so much optimism? ... Read More

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Newly Launched Utah Parkinson Disease Registry To Provide Insights Into Disease’s Causes
Clinical, Research
May 21, 2015

Newly Launched Utah Parkinson Disease Registry To Provide Insights Into Disease’s Causes

parkinson's disease

The Utah Parkinson Disease Registry (UPDR.org) was launched last week in an effort to understand an apparent rise in PD by 30 percent over the last ten years in Utah, and to uncover causes of the disease. Effective March 12, 2015, the Utah State Board of Health requires that health care providers report cases of PD and related movement disorders. Because Utah has one of the highest rates of PD in the nation, it is uniquely poised to contribute toward a new understanding of the disease.... Read More

Neurology
Innovative Approaches to Preventing Muscle Loss Earns Micah Drummond, Ph.D., AGS Investigator Award
Research, Recognition
May 20, 2015

Innovative Approaches to Preventing Muscle Loss Earns Micah Drummond, Ph.D., AGS Investigator Award

exercise, elderly

Assistant professor of physical therapy Micah Drummond, Ph.D., wields a rare trait that is becoming increasingly sought after in the world of scientific inquiry: he’s as equally comfortable explaining an exercise regimen to an elderly study volunteer as he is staring down a microscope. His translational approach to uncovering the secrets of staving off muscle loss during aging has earned him the 2015 Outstanding Junior Investigator Award from the American Geriatric Society.... Read More

Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
A Low-Tech Tool for Everyone's Health Toolbox
Clinical, Research, Health Care Transformation
May 12, 2015

A Low-Tech Tool for Everyone's Health Toolbox

Family health portraits are growing in importance as scientists race to find the genetic causes of all manner of diseases, and develop targeted drugs, treatments and personalized prevention plans. Most Americans understand this; 96 percent consider family health histories to be “very important” or “somewhat important,” according to 2014 survey by a pediatric oncologist and Associate Professor of Pediatrics here at the University of Utah. Yet fewer than 37 percent actively compile such information.... Read More

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Odd Genetic Syndrome Suggests Increased Blood Vessel Resistance Could Cause Hypertension
Research
May 11, 2015

Odd Genetic Syndrome Suggests Increased Blood Vessel Resistance Could Cause Hypertension

Internal Medicine, , hypertension

A new study reveals the genetic causes of a curious, rare syndrome that manifests as hypertension (high blood pressure) accompanied by short fingers (brachydactyly type E). Six unrelated families with the syndrome come from across the globe – United States, Turkey, France, South America, and two from Canada – yet share mutations that cluster in a small region of phosphodiesterase 3A (PDE3A). Functional studies imply the mutations change resistance of blood vessels, an underappreciated mechanism for regulating blood pressure. The findings, published in Nature Genetics, suggest new directions for investigating causes of hypertension in the general population. ... Read More

Internal Medicine
Walking an Extra Two Minutes Each Hour May Offset Hazards of Sitting Too Long
Research
Apr 30, 2015

Walking an Extra Two Minutes Each Hour May Offset Hazards of Sitting Too Long

sitting, exercise, wellness

A new study suggests that engaging in low intensity activities such as standing may not be enough to offset the health hazards of sitting for long periods of time. On the bright side, adding two minutes of walking each hour to your routine just might do the trick. These findings were published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN).... Read More

Internal Medicine
Clinical, Research
Apr 25, 2015

Study Calls Into Question Inducing Hypothermia to Treat Cardiac Arrest In Childen

cardiac arrest

A large-scale, multicenter study co-led by the University of Utah School of Medicine shows that emergency body cooling provides no benefit over actively maintaining normal body temperature in infants or children after cardiac arrest. Children treated by each of the two methods had equal rates of mortality and brain injury. The results were presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting in San Diego and published simultaneously in the New England Journal of Medicine. ... Read More

Pediatrics
Study Finds Childhood Cancer Survivors More Likely to Be Enrolled in Social Security Support as Adults
Health Care Transformation, Education, Research
Apr 21, 2015

Study Finds Childhood Cancer Survivors More Likely to Be Enrolled in Social Security Support as Adults

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Children with cancer have a good chance of surviving the disease—today more than 80% survive due to advances in treatment and care. However, recent studies have shown that some of these more than 420,000 U.S. childhood cancer survivors face future health related challenges as they become adults such as a second cancer diagnosis, cardiac failure, or other severe medical complications.... Read More

Mario Capecchi Recognized With AACR Lifetime Achievement in Cancer Research Award
Recognition, Research
Apr 17, 2015

Mario Capecchi Recognized With AACR Lifetime Achievement in Cancer Research Award

Huntsman Cancer Institute, , cancer, mario capecchi

Mario R. Capecchi, PhD, will be honored for his tremendous scientific contributions, which have had a profound impact on the understanding of cancer, including his groundbreaking work in the development of gene targeting technology, with the 12th annual American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Award for Lifetime Achievement in Cancer Research at the AACR Annual Meeting 2015, to be held in Philadelphia, April 18-22. ... Read More

Human Genetics
New Method Increases Accuracy of Ovarian Cancer Prognosis and Diagnosis
Research
Apr 15, 2015

New Method Increases Accuracy of Ovarian Cancer Prognosis and Diagnosis

ovarian cancer, chemotherapy resistance

University of Utah scientists have uncovered patterns of DNA anomalies that predict a woman’s outcome significantly better than tumor stage. In addition, these patterns are the first known indicator of how well a woman will respond to platinum therapy. Published in the journal PLOS ONE, the patterns were discovered by using a new mathematical technique in the analysis of DNA profiles from the Cancer Genome Atlas, a national database containing data from hundreds of ovarian cancer patients. ... Read More

Human Genetics,Obstetrics and Gynecology
Characterization of the Nutrient Needs of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Leads to the Identification of a Molecular Signature for Cancer Outcomes
Health Care Transformation, Research, Education
Apr 13, 2015

Characterization of the Nutrient Needs of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Leads to the Identification of a Molecular Signature for Cancer Outcomes

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Compared to other types of breast cancer, triple negative breast cancers are often more aggressive and have fewer treatment options. In a new study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute and the University of Utah have identified a molecular mechanism that triple negative breast cancer cells use to survive and grow.... Read More

U. Geneticists Unlocking Nature’s Mysteries and Clues to Life Saving Treatments
Research, Clinical
Apr 10, 2015

U. Geneticists Unlocking Nature’s Mysteries and Clues to Life Saving Treatments

birth defect

A University of Utah study published in Nature Genetics is the first to document how genes build the diaphragm. This is important, writes New York Times science writer Carl Zimmer, because the diaphragm appears to have played a pivotal role in our evolution as a species. It also helps explain what goes wrong in babies born with a catastrophic birth defect know as a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). ... Read More

Human Genetics
Research
Apr 06, 2015

Severe Malaria Marked by Unique Biochemical Changes: Finding Could Lead to Better Treatments

Previous studies by an international team of malaria researchers had shown that this condition is also marked by lower production of nitric oxide in the cells lining these micro-vessels. Reversing this deficiency could help prevent malaria-infected red cells from sticking to blood vessel walls and avoid this dire condition. A follow-up study by these researchers in Tanzania, Indonesia, Australia and the U.S. has shown one reason for poor nitric oxide production. A critical co-factor for an enzyme that produces nitric oxide must be “charged” with potential energy. ... Read More

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Noted UCSF Scientist Joins Research Team at Huntsman Cancer Institute
Research
Apr 06, 2015

Noted UCSF Scientist Joins Research Team at Huntsman Cancer Institute

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Martin McMahon, Ph.D., joins Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah in August as Professor in the Department of Dermatology and HCI Senior Director of Pre-Clinical Translation. Professor McMahon is currently the Efim Guzik Distinguished Professor of Cancer Biology at the University of California, San Francisco and Assistant Director of Professional Education and Co-leader of the Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center (HCFCCC) Developmental Therapeutics Program.... Read More

Research is not for the Faint of Heart
Education, Health Care Transformation, Clinical, Research
Mar 30, 2015

Research is not for the Faint of Heart

Imagine being a young scientist today. A steady drumbeat of authority figures have encouraged you to pursue science and technology. You’re told there’s a shortage of people trained to work in these fields. But by the time you finish your graduate work, you learn there are more Ph.D.’s than there is funding to support them––that your federal grant application has a one in six chance of getting funded. ... Read More

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New Insights Into Little Known But Common Birth Defect: Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia
Research, Clinical
Mar 25, 2015

New Insights Into Little Known But Common Birth Defect: Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

birth defect, congenital diaphragmatic hernia

Although many genetic mutations have been linked to CDH, a new study from the University of Utah School of Medicine is the first to demonstrate a linkage between genetic variation and a physiological mechanism that gives rise to defects in the diaphragm. The research points to a crucial role for connective tissue in CDH, and in guiding normal development of the diaphragm. These findings were published March 25, 2015, in Nature Genetics.... Read More

Human Genetics
A Call for Caution Before Genetically Engineering Humans
Research, Education
Mar 19, 2015

A Call for Caution Before Genetically Engineering Humans

genetic engineering, genetics

A group of 18 leaders in the field of genomic engineering have written a perspective to be published in the journal Science Express on March 19, cautioning fellow scientists from going down this path too quickly. They call for a moratorium on genetically engineering changes in human DNA that would be passed to future generations. Before this can happen, they say, scientists, clinicians, and the general public must agree on the best ways to ensure the safety and efficacy of the technology. ... Read More

Biochemistry
Research, Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Education
Mar 17, 2015

When did computers and engineering become something that men do?

diversity, research, education, women in medicine

Cynthia Furse’s teenage daughter was skilled in math and science and had voiced an interest in engineering. But based on a career aptitude test that showed she liked helping people, a school counselor insisted nursing was a better fit. Why nursing and not medical school – or engineering, for that matter? And why should engineering be perceived as incompatible with wanting to help people, Furse wondered.... Read More

Want to Touch a Brain?
Research, Education
Mar 11, 2015

Want to Touch a Brain?

Members of the public can touch a human brain or move a ball with their thoughts during Brain Awareness Day on Saturday, March 21 at the Leonardo museum. Admission to the entire museum will be free all day. Brain Awareness Day activities will be presented at the museum from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the atrium of the Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South in downtown Salt Lake City.... Read More

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Education, Research, Clinical
Mar 10, 2015

Improving Data Quality to Equalize Patient Care

health sciences research, ccts

The Health Services Research Conference Program Committee invites current and future researchers, policy makers, clinicians, administrators, public health practitioners, and other interested members of the community to attend the 10th annual Utah Health Services Research Conference: Considering Data Quality in Health Services Research. ... Read More

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Largest study of its kind documents causes of childhood community-acquired pneumonia
Research, Clinical
Feb 25, 2015

Largest study of its kind documents causes of childhood community-acquired pneumonia

pneumonia, rsv

To investigate the specific causes and prevalence of childhood CAP, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) led the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study in collaboration with institutions including University of Utah Health Sciences. They report that among children diagnosed with pneumonia, viral infections were much more common than bacterial infections (73 vs. 15 percent), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was the most commonly detected pathogen. The results, which could inform improved strategies for prevention and treatment, were published in The New England Journal of Medicine.... Read More

Pediatrics
Novel
Research
Feb 09, 2015

Novel "Smart" Insulin Automatically Adjusts Blood Sugar in Diabetic Mouse Model

diabetes, insulin

Scientists have created a novel, long-lasting "smart" insulin that self-activates when blood sugar soars. Tests on mouse models for type 1 diabetes show that one injection works for a minimum of 14 hours, during which it can repeatedly and automatically lower blood sugar levels after simulated meals, mimicking blood sugar recovery in healthy mice. The finding represents an important advance in insulin therapy for diabetics and will be published Feb. 9 in PNAS Early Edition.... Read More

Biochemistry
Identification of a Much-Needed Drug Target Against MRSA, Gram-Positive Infections
Research
Feb 02, 2015

Identification of a Much-Needed Drug Target Against MRSA, Gram-Positive Infections

mrsa, antibiotic-resistance

Scientists at the University of Utah and the University of Georgia have uncovered a pharmacological target that could enable development of novel drugs against antibiotic-resistant pathogens, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other infectious Gram-positive organisms such as Listeria and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The target was revealed upon discovery of a Gram-positive bacteria-specific pathway for making heme, an essential iron-carrying molecule. The findings were reported in the journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). ... Read More

Internal Medicine,Pathology
The Promise of Personalized Medicine
Education, Clinical, Health Care Transformation, Research
Jan 27, 2015

The Promise of Personalized Medicine

personalized health

Recently, Willard H. Dere, M.D., FACP––an internationally regarded medical researcher and leader in the biopharmaceutical industry, and former U. faculty member––returned to the University of Utah to lead our Program in Personalized Health. Dere comes to us following 25 years in the biopharmaceutical industry where he held top posts at some of the world’s largest drug makers, such as Amgen and Eli Lilly. A history major in college, Dere offers an interesting perspective on advances in health care and the emerging role of personalized medicine. ... Read More

Human Genetics
Cell Mechanism Discovered That May Cause Pancreatic Cancer
Research
Jan 27, 2015

Cell Mechanism Discovered That May Cause Pancreatic Cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah have found that defects in how cells are squeezed out of overcrowded tissue to die, a process called extrusion, may be a mechanism by which pancreatic cancer begins. From these findings, they may have identified an effective way to reverse the defective extrusion’s effects without destroying normal tissues nearby. The results were published in the latest edition of the journal eLife.... Read More

Immune System Promotes Digestive Health by Fostering Community of “Good” Gut Bacteria
Research
Jan 22, 2015

Immune System Promotes Digestive Health by Fostering Community of “Good” Gut Bacteria

digestive health, ibd, good bacteria, microbiota

As many as 1.4 million Americans suffer from uncomfortable abdominal cramping and diarrhea that come with ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. These conditions, collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are associated with an imbalance among the thousands of species of “good” bacteria that inhabit the gut. A University of Utah study published on Jan. 22, 2015, in Cell Host and Microbe demonstrates that the immune system protein MyD88 mediates a conversation between the immune system and good bacteria in the gut that is key to digestive health.... Read More

Pathology
New Study Findings Help Physicians and Patients Determine Prostate Cancer Risk
Research, Clinical
Jan 09, 2015

New Study Findings Help Physicians and Patients Determine Prostate Cancer Risk

Huntsman Cancer Institute, , prostate cancer, cancer, psa

A discovery by researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute shows that looking at whether a man’s uncles and great-grandparents, among other second- and third-degree relatives, had prostate cancer could be as important as looking at whether his father had prostate cancer. A more complete family history would give physicians a new tool to decide whether or not a PSA test was appropriate.... Read More

Internal Medicine
New Study Findings Help Physicians and Patients Determine Prostate Cancer Risk
Research
Jan 08, 2015

New Study Findings Help Physicians and Patients Determine Prostate Cancer Risk

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

A discovery by researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute shows that looking at whether a man’s uncles and great-grandparents, among other second- and third-degree relatives, had prostate cancer could be as important as looking at whether his father had prostate cancer. A more complete family history would give physicians a new tool to decide whether or not a PSA test was appropriate.... Read More

Defying Textbook Science, Study Finds New Role for Proteins
Research
Jan 01, 2015

Defying Textbook Science, Study Finds New Role for Proteins

proteins, protein synthesis

Open any introductory biology textbook and one of the first things you’ll learn is that our DNA spells out the instructions for making proteins, tiny machines that do much of the work in our body’s cells. Results from a study published on Jan. 2 in Science defy textbook science, showing for the first time that the building blocks of a protein, called amino acids, can be assembled without blueprints – DNA and an intermediate template called messenger RNA (mRNA). A team of researchers has observed a case in which another protein specifies which amino acids are added. ... Read More

Biochemistry
Human DNA Shows Traces of 40 Million-Year Battle For Survival Between Primate and Pathogen
Research
Dec 11, 2014

Human DNA Shows Traces of 40 Million-Year Battle For Survival Between Primate and Pathogen

dna, evolution, infectious disease

Examination of DNA from 21 primate species - from squirrel monkeys to humans - exposes an evolutionary war against infectious bacteria over iron that circulates in the bloodstream. Supported by experimental evidence, these findings, published in Science on Dec. 12, demonstrate the vital importance of an underappreciated defense mechanism, nutritional immunity. ... Read More

Human Genetics
Research on a Rare Cancer Exposes Possible Route to New Treatments
Research
Nov 26, 2014

Research on a Rare Cancer Exposes Possible Route to New Treatments

Huntsman Cancer Institute, childhood cancers

Researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) discovered the unusual role of lactate in the metabolism of alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS), a rare, aggressive cancer that primarily affects adolescents and young adults. The study also confirmed that a fusion gene is the cancer-causing agent in this disease. The research results were published online in the journal Cancer Cell November 26.... Read More

Bam.iobio: An Interactive, Real-Time, Sequence Alignment Inspector App
Research
Nov 25, 2014

Bam.iobio: An Interactive, Real-Time, Sequence Alignment Inspector App

Bam.iobio (http://bam.iobio.io/) is the first app of its kind that allows scientists to analyze genome sequence data on their web browser, interactively, and in real-time, without having to rely on terabytes of storage and vast sources of computing power. The resource, developed by a team led by Gabor Marth, D.Sc., co-director of the USTAR Center for Genetic Discovery and human genetics professor at the University of Utah, appears online in the journal Nature Methods on Nov. 25.... Read More

Human Genetics
Huntsman Cancer Institute Investigator Recognized Among World's Most Cited Researchers
Research
Nov 21, 2014

Huntsman Cancer Institute Investigator Recognized Among World's Most Cited Researchers

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Michael Deininger, MD, PhD, a Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) investigator and professor of internal medicine at the University of Utah, has been listed among the world’s Highly Cited Researchers in 2014 by Thomson Reuters, an international media firm. The list includes more than 3,000 authors worldwide in 21 science and social science fields, representing the top 1% of authors most cited in their specialty areas for the years 2002 to 2012.... Read More

Are Ear Infections Overtreated in White Children?
Research
Nov 17, 2014

Are Ear Infections Overtreated in White Children?

Internal Medicine, ,

Black children are less likely to be diagnosed with and less likely to receive broad-spectrum antibiotics for ear infections than white children are, a new study has found. But the discrepancy in prescribing fewer broad-spectrum antibiotics means black children actually are more likely to receive care that aligns with the recommended guidelines for treating ear infections. Two possible behaviors behind this finding is overtreatment and overdiagnosis in white children and undertreatment and underdiagnosis in black children. The research appears in Pediatrics online on Nov. 17, 2014.... Read More

Pediatrics
Huntsman Cancer Institute Investigator Receives Leadership Award from the National Cancer Institute
Research
Nov 14, 2014

Huntsman Cancer Institute Investigator Receives Leadership Award from the National Cancer Institute

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Neeraj Agarwal, MD, a Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) investigator and associate professor of medicine at the University of Utah, has received the 2014 Cancer Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Award from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). This highly competitive award recognizes exceptional cancer investigators for contributions to advancing clinical research through collaborative team science.... Read More

Research, Education, Clinical
Nov 09, 2014

AAMC 2014: Medicine in 140 Characters: How can Twitter Advance Research and Care?

aamc, social media, education

Twitter isn't just for Justin Bieber fans anymore. More and more doctors are using the microblogging service to find each other, and to share research. University of Utah Hospital Associate Vice President for Clinical Affairs Sean Mulvihill, M.D., spoke with Emory University's Richard Duszak, M.D., (@RichDuszak) about all that can be accomplished in 140 characters or less. ... Read More

Fueling the
Research
Oct 28, 2014

Fueling the "Maker Movement"

students, education, innovation

Academia is hierarchical, a space where faculty are judged by the size of their NIH grants and research portfolios. But entrepreneurs can have just as great an impact on patient care and the bottom line¿and who better to tinker and dream than students?... Read More

Research
Aug 12, 2014

TED Talk: Molecular Animations help Test Hypotheses

research, inventors

Complex 3D scientific animation is replacing rough sketches and furthering the understanding of complex molecular movement and development. And University of Utah researcher and TED fellow Janet Iwasa, Ph.D., is collaborating with top scientists across the country to create comprehensive molecular models for different viruses, including the AIDS virus. ... Read More

Huntsman Cancer Institute Receives Funding to Establish a National Clinical Trials Network Site
Research
Jul 17, 2014

Huntsman Cancer Institute Receives Funding to Establish a National Clinical Trials Network Site

Huntsman Cancer Institute, u0035345

A team of physician-researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) will receive nearly $3.6 million over the next five years in a cooperative agreement with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to establish a Network Lead Academic Participating Site (NLAPS). The award places HCI in an elite group of only 30 to 40 NLAPS locations nationwide; these sites are part of the NIH effort to create a new National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN).... Read More

A New Tool to Confront Lung Cancer
Research
Jun 19, 2014

A New Tool to Confront Lung Cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Only 15% of patients with squamous cell lung cancer – the second most common lung cancer – survive five years past diagnosis. Little is understood about how the deadly disease arises, preventing development of targeted therapies that could serve as a second line of defense once standard chemotherapy regimens fail.... Read More

The Renegades of Cell Biology: Researchers Discover Why K-Ras Gene Mutations Prove So Deadly in Cancer
Research
Dec 19, 2013

The Renegades of Cell Biology: Researchers Discover Why K-Ras Gene Mutations Prove So Deadly in Cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Cells with a mutation in the gene called K-Ras—found in close to 30% of all cancers, but mostly those with worst prognosis, such as pancreatic cancer, colon cancer, and lung cancer—behave in ways that subvert the normal mechanisms of cell death, according to a cell-culture study by researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah.... Read More

C.H. Hardin Branch Auditorium Dedication
Research
Oct 16, 2013

C.H. Hardin Branch Auditorium Dedication

The University Neuropsychiatric Institute (UNI) and the Department of Psychiatry dedicated the new auditorium at UNI as the C. H. Hardin Branch Auditorium, in honor of the department's founder and pioneer in modern psychiatry. ... Read More

Psychiatry
Children's Cancer Target of $1.73MM Grant
Research
Oct 04, 2013

Children's Cancer Target of $1.73MM Grant

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

CureSearch for Children's Cancer this week awarded researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah a $1.73 million grant to test a novel targeted treatment for Ewing sarcoma that hopefully will disrupt the cancer's growth and spread. If successful, their work could lead to new treatment for the more than 250 children diagnosed with this rare cancer each year.... Read More

Melanoma Linked to Chronic Sun Damage Target of $1.5 MM Grant
Research
Sep 25, 2013

Melanoma Linked to Chronic Sun Damage Target of $1.5 MM Grant

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has awarded Huntsman Cancer Institute investigator Matt VanBrocklin, Ph.D., more than $1.5 million over the next five years to continue studying the role of a gene called c-KIT in the origin and growth of melanoma, a devastating and sometimes deadly skin cancer. VanBrocklin is an assistant professor in the Department of Surgery at the University of Utah.... Read More

Prenatal Care: Breaking Through Tradition and Habit
Health Care Transformation, Research, Clinical
Aug 14, 2013

Prenatal Care: Breaking Through Tradition and Habit

Prenatal care is governed by medical dogma. Mothers first check in with their doctors around eight weeks’ gestation, setting in motion a regimented schedule of clinic visits and tests - prenatal labs, genetic screening, the clinical ultrasound, gestational diabetes testing, Group B Strep screening - that mark the long, 40-week march to a baby. ... Read More

Family Members of Children With Cancer May Also Be At Risk
Research
Aug 08, 2013

Family Members of Children With Cancer May Also Be At Risk

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

When a child is diagnosed with cancer, one of the first questions the parents ask is "Will my other children get cancer?" A new study from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah suggests the answer to that question depends on whether or not a family history of cancer exists. The research results were published online in the International Journal of Cancer and will appear in the November 15 print issue.... Read More

Research
Jul 25, 2013

Can scientific animations lead to new discoveries? Janet Iwasa, Ph.D., says next-generation visualization speeds research

innovation, inventors, research, collaboration

Drawing pictures. As simplistic and unscientific as it sounds, pictures have been one of the most powerful tools scientists have used to help them understand and explain the unknown. Today, the rough sketches of centuries past have given way to elaborate computer animations that are helping researchers understand the inner workings of some of the most mysterious and miniscule science there is - that of cell processes deep within our bodies. ... Read More

At Fertilization Dad's Genome More Ready Than Mom's; but Mom's Catches Up on Its Own
Research
May 10, 2013

At Fertilization Dad's Genome More Ready Than Mom's; but Mom's Catches Up on Its Own

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah have discovered that while the genes provided by the father arrive at fertilization pre-programmed to the state needed by the embryo, the genes provided by the mother are in a different state and must be reprogrammed to match. The findings have important implications for both developmental biology and cancer biology.... Read More

A Powerful, More Accurate, Genetic Analysis Tool Opens New Gene-Regulation Realms
Research
Apr 22, 2013

A Powerful, More Accurate, Genetic Analysis Tool Opens New Gene-Regulation Realms

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah have developed a novel and powerful technique to identify the targets for a group of enzymes called RNA cytosine methyltransferases (RMTs) in human RNA. They applied their technique to a particular RMT, NSUN2, which has been implicated in mental retardation and cancers in humans, finding and validating many previously unknown RMT targets—an indication of the technique's power. The research results were published online in the journal Nature Biotechnology on April 21.... Read More

New Medical Director Named at the University of Utah's Huntsman Cancer Institute
Research
Mar 27, 2013

New Medical Director Named at the University of Utah's Huntsman Cancer Institute

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

John Sweetenham, M.D., currently a Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego, and Medical Director of the UCSD University of Nevada Cancer Institute, has been appointed Senior Director of Clinical Affairs and Executive Medical Director at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI), and Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Hematologic Oncology at the University of Utah after a national search. He will assume his post April 1.... Read More

Possible New Treatment for a Childhood Cancer
Research
Nov 26, 2012

Possible New Treatment for a Childhood Cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Discovery of a new drug with high potential to treat Ewing sarcoma, an often deadly cancer of children and young adults, and the previously unknown mechanism behind it, come hand-in-hand in a new study by researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah. The report appears in today’s online issue of the journal Oncogene.... Read More

New Discovery about DNA Packaging
Research
Nov 16, 2012

New Discovery about DNA Packaging

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

A new discovery from researchers at HCI concerning a fundamental understanding about how DNA works will produce a "180-degree change in focus" for researchers who study how gene packaging regulates gene activity, including genes that cause cancer and other diseases.... Read More

Genetic Test Results for Lynch Syndrome Improved with New Computer Program
Research
Oct 31, 2012

Genetic Test Results for Lynch Syndrome Improved with New Computer Program

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Many patients who have genetic testing for Lynch syndrome, a hereditary predisposition to colon cancer, receive the inconclusive result "variants of uncertain clinical significance." This can be a problem, as people with Lynch syndrome have a much higher probability to develop colon cancer, and often develop colon cancer at an earlier age than is common among the general population; consequently, they need to begin screening at a much younger age.... Read More

Genomic Study of Rare Children's Cancer Yields Possible Prognostic Tool
Research
Aug 08, 2012

Genomic Study of Rare Children's Cancer Yields Possible Prognostic Tool

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

A new study of the genetic makeup, or genome, of Ewing sarcoma, a rare cancer that strikes children, teenagers, and young adults, has produced multiple discoveries: a previously unknown sarcoma subtype, genetic factors related to long-term survival, and identification of a genetic change between the primary and metastatic stages of the disease that could lead to better, more targeted treatment.... Read More

Will My Breast Cancer Spread?
Research
Oct 24, 2011

Will My Breast Cancer Spread?

Huntsman Cancer Institute,

Researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah have discovered a new way to model human breast cancer that could lead to new tools for predicting which breast cancers will spread and new ways to test drugs that may stop its spread.... Read More

Driving Discovery


Zebrafish: A Gateway to Understanding the Genetics of Osteoarthritis

Millions of people worldwide deal with osteoarthritis, a debilitating and painful disease where the protective cartilage capping the bones slowly wears away over time due to abnormal remodeling of the tissue that make...

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Culturally Appropriate Treatments Better for Lower Back Pain

Chronic lower back pain continues to be a major health concern in the United States. The Hispanic community is particularly troubled by this affliction. While translating health care materials into Spanish is a first ...

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Implementing the New Blood Pressure Guidelines: How One Clinic Got Up to Speed

Clinicians at University of Utah Health have completed a study demonstrating how guideline-quality office blood pressure measurements and home blood pressure monitoring - often viewed as cumbersome and time-consuming ...

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Decoding Dry Mouth to Help Millions Regain the Ability to Swallow

A healthy person produces three to six cups of saliva a day. Those with Sjögren’s syndrome, an autoimmune disease, produce far less. Researchers at the University of Utah Health identified an important mole...

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