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U of U Health Initiatives and Programs

    Increasing URiM Family Medicine Residents at University of Utah Health

    The Department of Family and Preventive Medicine is home for the University of Utah’s Family Medicine Residency program. Although Utah’s diversity is steadily increasing, the race/ethnic diversity of the program’s family medicine residency does not reflect the state’s general population.

    Intentional resident recruitment initiatives can transform racial/ethnic diversity in a family medicine residency program in a short amount of time.

    Authors

    • Kirsten Stoesser, MD, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Kara A. Frame, MD, University of Utah Family Medicine Residency, University of Utah Health Salt Lake City, UT
    • Osman Sanyer, MD, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Jennifer P. Leiser, MD, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Laura Elizabeth Moreno, MD, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Clarivette Bosch, MD, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Jessica L. Jones, MD, MSPH, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Jessica J. Morales, MD, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Stephanie Rolón Rodríguez, MD, MS, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Jenifer Wilson, BA, Office of the Associate Vice President for Health Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Line Kemeyou, MD, Office of Health Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT
    • José E. Rodríguez, MD, FAAFP, Office for Health Equity and Inclusion, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    Stoesser, K., Frame, K. A., Sanyer, O., Leiser, J. P., Moreno, L. E., Bosch, C., Jones, J. L., Morales, J. J., Rodríguez, S. R., Wilson, J., Kemeyou, L., & Rodríguez, J. E. (2021). Increasing URiM Family Medicine Residents at University of Utah Health. PRiMER (Leawood, Kan.)5, 42. https://doi.org/10.22454/PRiMER.2021.279738

    Introspection to Improve Pipelines and Graduate Programs at University of Utah Health

    Although attrition represents a methodological challenge for evaluating our program, we agree that student factors are but a small part of the challenge, and will heed the call for introspection.

    Authors

    • José E. Rodríguez, MD, Office for Health Equity and Inclusion, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Carolyn Bliss, PhD, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Kathryn Browning Hawes, BS, Office for Health Equity and Inclusion, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Nora Wood, PhD, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Mike Martineau, PhD, Office of Business and Institutional Analytics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Marissa L. Diener, PhD, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Ana María López, MD, MPH, MACP, The Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA

    Rodríguez JE, Bliss C, Hawes KB, et al. Introspection to Improve Pipelines and Graduate Programs at University of Utah Health. Fam Med. 2021;53(8):730-730. https://doi.org/10.22454/FamMed.2021.377645.

    Increasing racial and ethnic diversity at the University of Utah physician assistant program

    Among the oldest in the nation, the University of Utah Physician Assistant Program (UPAP) serves the state of Utah and surrounding areas and is a division of the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. Recognizing the need to produce health care providers from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds, UPAP instituted structural changes to improve student compositional diversity. This paper is a presentation and evaluation of the changes made to determine their relationship with compositional diversity, ultimate practice setting, and national rankings.

    Authors

    • Darin Ryujin, MS, MPAS, PA-C, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
    • Jared Spackman, MPAS, PA-C, Physician Assistant Program, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Trenton J. Honda, PhD, MMS, PA-C, Northeastern University Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Boston, MA
    • Virginia Valentin L., DrPH, PA-C, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Doris Dalton, MPA, Physician Assistant Program, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Mauricio Laguan, BA, Office of the Associate Vice President for Health Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Wendy L. Hobson, MD, MSPH, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
    • José E. Rodríguez, MD, Office for Health Equity and Inclusion, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    Ryujin D, Spackman J, Honda TJ, et al. Increasing Racial and Ethnic Diversity at the University of Utah Physician Assistant Program. Fam Med. 2021;53(5):372-375. https://doi.org/10.22454/FamMed.2021.923340.

    Preparing historically underrepresented trainees for biomedical cancer research careers at Huntsman Cancer Institute/University of Utah Health

    Given the well-documented inequities in health care outcomes by race, ethnicity, and gender, many health career pipeline programs have focused on supporting the development of a diverse and inclusive workforce. PathMaker is a regional, competitive pipeline program that nurtures high school or undergraduate trainees from historically underrepresented backgrounds towards a career in cancer research. Our faculty and staff team collaboratively developed a cohort model curriculum that increased student awareness of research career options; provided academic and professional development, cultural and social support, evolutionary success strategies, active mentorship, and leadership skill development; and fostered an environment of continuous evaluation and improvement. PathMaker is a replicable model to increase diversity and inclusion in the biomedical cancer research workforce.

    Authors

    • Ana María López, Professor and Vice Chair of Medical Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadephia, PA, USA
    • José E Rodríguez, Professor of Family Medicine and Associate Vice President for Health Equity Diversity and Inclusion, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    • Kathryn Browning Hawes, Office of Health Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    • Anna Marsden, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    • Don Ayer, Department of Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute/University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    • Donna Harp Ziegenfuss, Associate Librarian, Marriott Library, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    • Kola Okuyemi, Professor and Department Chair of Family & Preventive Medicine

    Ana María López, José E Rodríguez, Kathryn Browning Hawes, Anna Marsden, Don Ayer, Donna Harp Ziegenfuss & Kola Okuyemi (2021) Preparing historically underrepresented trainees for biomedical cancer research careers at Huntsman Cancer Institute/University of Utah Health, Medical Education Online, 26:1, DOI: 10.1080/10872981.2021.1929045

    Pre-loss group therapy for dementia family care partners at risk for complicated grief

    Dementia family caregiving may span more than a decade and places many family care partners (CPs) at risk for poor bereavement outcomes; estimates of complicated grief in bereaved dementia family CPs range from 10% to 20%. We adapted our efficacious complicated grief group therapy intervention for bereaved dementia caregivers for soon-to-be bereaved dementia CPs at risk for complicated grief to facilitate healthy death preparedness and eventual bereavement-pre-loss group therapy (PLGT).

    Authors

    • Katherine P Supiano, University of Utah College of Nursing Salt Lake City USA
    • Troy Andersen, University of Utah College of Social Work Salt Lake City USA
    • Marilyn Luptak, University of Utah College of Social Work Salt Lake City USA
    • Cynthia Beynon, University of Utah College of Nursing Salt Lake City USA
    • Eli Iacob, University of Utah College of Nursing Salt Lake City USA
    • Sarah Elizabeth Levitt, University of Utah College of Nursing Salt Lake City USA

    Supiano KP, Andersen T, Luptak M, Beynon C, Iacob E, Levitt SE. Pre-loss group therapy for dementia family care partners at risk for complicated grief. Alzheimers Dement (N Y). 2021 May 13;7(1):e12167. doi: 10.1002/trc2.12167. PMID: 34027022; PMCID: PMC8116857.

    Lessons from the first decade of the Native American Summer Research Internship at the University of Utah

    American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations are facing multiple health crises, including limited access to care, high rates of chronic disease, and early mortality that is far worse than other underrepresented minorities in the United States. In 2010, the University of Utah partnered with research, cultural, and professional mentors to create a 10-week summer Native American Research Internship (NARI) program for AI/AN college students across the United States who are interested in pursuing biomedical careers. NARI attracts and supports AI/AN students by offering mentored summer research internships in an innovative, culturally aware framework that adapts to observed challenges to optimize educational experiences and support biomedical career aspirations.

    Authors

    • Maija Holsti, MD, MPH, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
    • E.B. Clark is professor, Department of Pediatrics, and associate vice president for clinical affairs, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
    • Simon Fisher, MD, Department of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
    • Sam Hawkins, MD, Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania
    • Heather Keenan, MD, PhD, MPH, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
    • Steven Just, PharmD, Walgreens, Minneapolis, Minnesota; recent graduate, College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
    • Jaymus Lee,second-year graduate student in applied biosciences, Controlled Environmental Agriculture Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
    • Ed Napia, PhD, Urban Indian Center of Salt Lake, Salt Lake City, Utah
    • J.E. Rodriguez, MD, Department of Family Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
    • Franci Taylor, PhDr, American Indian Resource Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
    • Richard White, MEd, American Indian/Alaska Native Clinical and Translational Research Program, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana
    • Scott Willie, NARI Program, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
    • Carrie L. Byington, MD University of California, Oakland, California

    Holsti, Maija MD, MPH; Clark, Edward B. MD; Fisher, Simon MD, PhD; Hawkins, Sam MD; Keenan, Heather MD, PhD, MPH; Just, Steven PharmD; Lee, Jaymus; Napia, Ed PhD; Rodriguez, Jose E. MD; Taylor, Franci PhD; White, Richard MEd; Willie, Scott; Byington, Carrie L. MD Lessons From the First Decade of the Native American Summer Research Internship at the University of Utah, Academic Medicine: April 2021 - Volume 96 - Issue 4 - p 522-528 doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000003759

    No Food for Thought: Documenting the Prevalence of Food Insecurity among Medical Students at One Western University

    Students, as a vulnerable population, experience high rates of food insecurity. Medical students’ needs have not been fully assessed and often go unmet. Food security among medical students was surveyed using USDA’s 6-item Food Security Module. Respondents (N = 170) were scored as food secure, food insecure, or very low food secure. Of 170 participants, 87 (51%) experienced food insecurity in the past year, five times the national average of 2018 (11.1%). Sixty (35%) respondents reported experiencing low food security, and 27 (16%) respondents reported very low food security placing them at risk of not meeting other basic needs, limiting academic pursuits.

    Authors

    • Alyssa Thorman, Medical Student, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah
    • Harneet Dhillon, Medical Student, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah

    Harneet Dhillon, Alyssa Thorman, Jordan Franchina. (2021) Weeding Out Hunger: A Community Garden and Food Pantry Approach to Address Medical Student Food InsecurityJournal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition 0:0, pages 1-5.

    Exceeding expectations: students underrepresented in medicine at University of Utah Health

    The University of Utah serves an increasingly diverse state and houses the only public medical school, dental school, and college of pharmacy in the state. Utah’s diversity in the health professions lags behind the diversity of its general population, and the nation. The Health Sciences Learning, Engagement, Achievement, and Progress (HS-LEAP) Program is associated with increased students underrepresented in medicine success in undergraduate programs and elevated participation in graduate programs in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, physician assistant, nursing, and public health. Similar programs, with continuous assessment and evaluation, could be adopted in other locations to improve the representation of these groups in health professions.

    Authors

    • Carolyn Bliss, PhD, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Nora Wood, PhD, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Mike Martineau, PhD, Office of Business and Institutional Analytics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Kathryn Browning Hawes, BS, Office for Health Equity and Inclusion, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
    • Ana María López, MD, MPH, MACP, The Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA
    • José E. Rodríguez, MD, Office for Health Equity and Inclusion, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    Bliss C, Wood N, Martineau M, Hawes KB, López AM, Rodríguez JE. Exceeding Expectations: Students Underrepresented in Medicine at University of Utah Health. Fam Med. 2020;52(8):570-575. https://doi.org/10.22454/FamMed.2020.137698.

    Higher levels of self-efficacy and readiness for a future career of Spanish speaking physician assistant students after their volunteer work in a student-run free clinic in the United States

    Volunteering at a free clinic may influence career choice among health profession students. The purpose of this study was to explore knowledge, skills, attitudes, self-efficacy, interest in future work with the underserved, and interest in primary care among physician assistant (PA) students through an analysis of demographic characteristics of PA students at a student-run free clinic in the United States.

    Authors

    • Shannon Weaver, Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    • Zainub Hussaini, Department of Sociology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    • Virginia Lynn Valentin, Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    • Samin Panahi, Department of Sociology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    • Sarah Elizabeth Levitt, Department of Nutrition and Integrative Physiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    • Jeanie Ashby, Maliheh Free Clinic, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    • Akiko Kamimura, Department of Sociology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA

    Weaver, S., Hussaini, Z., Valentin, V. L., Panahi, S., Levitt, S. E., Ashby, J., & Kamimura, A. (2019). Higher levels of self-efficacy and readiness for a future career of Spanish speaking physician assistant students after their volunteer work in a student-run free clinic in the United States. Journal of educational evaluation for health professions16, 27. https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.27

    U of U Health Authors

      Oral health is an integral component of age-friendly care

      Although dental literature may not have directly informed the 4Ms framework at its inception, it is becoming increasingly evident that oral health is a critical component of geriatric care. We believe healthcare professionals and policymakers should explicitly include oral health as an essential component of the Age-Friendly Health Systems movement.

      Authors

      • Alberto Enrique Varela DDS, Section of Geriatric and Adult Special Care Dentistry, University of Utah School of Dentistry, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
      • Jose E. Rodriguez MD, Office of the Associate Vice-President for Health Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
      • Timothy W. Farrell MD, AGSF, Division of Geriatrics, Spencer Fox Eccles School of Medicine at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

      Varela, A.E., Rodriguez, J.E. and Farrell, T.W. (2022), Oral health is an integral component of age-friendly care. J Am Geriatr Soc. https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.17834

      We can do better

      Looking across the healthcare professions, some professional oaths pay homage to the importance of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI), and others do not. Notably, the Hippocratic Oath, both the original and a widely accepted modern version, is silent on the issue. The Oath of the Pharmacist, on the other hand, was recently updated to describe not only the actions that will be taken to advance DEI (promote inclusion, embrace diversity, advocate for justice), but the ends this oath will achieve—advancing health equity.

      Authors

      • Daytheon Sturges, PhD, MPAS, PA-C, Family Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
      • Jeanne Cawse-Lucas, MD, Department of Family Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
      • Darin Ryujin MS, MPAS, PA-C, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
      • José E. Rodríguez MD, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
      • Temple S. Howell-Stampley MD, MBA, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
      • Bau P. Tran PharmD, MMS, PA-C, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Texas Tech University College of Pharmacy, Dallas, TX
      • Trenton J. Honda PhD, MMS, PA-C, School of Clinical and Rehabilitation Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston, MA

      Sturges, Daytheon PhD, MPAS, PA-C; Cawse-Lucas, Jeanne MD; Ryujin, Darin MS, MPAS, PA-C; Rodriguez, José E. MD; Howell-Stampley, Temple S. MD, MBA; Tran, Bau P. PharmD, MMS, PA-C; Honda, Trenton J. PhD, MMS, PA-C We can do better, JAAPA: April 2022 - Volume 35 - Issue 4 - p 14-15 doi: 10.1097/01.JAA.0000827124.00118.42

      Address White Fragility in Order to Engage in Racial Caucusing

      Guh et al demonstrated how a 90-minute experiential workshop on racial affinity caucusing (RAC) enabled participants to feel comfortable implementing RAC at their own institutions...In places where faculty are unfamiliar with the power of RAC, gaining familiarity with the realities of White fragility may be a prerequisite for an RAC workshop, and can be further explored in that space.

      Authors

      • Tiffany Ho, MD, MPH, University of Utah Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT
      • José Rodríguez, MD, FAAFP, Office of Health Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, UT

      Ho T, Rodríguez J. Address White Fragility In Order to Engage in Racial Caucusing. Fam Med. 2022;54(4):318-318. https://doi.org/10.22454/FamMed.2022.162964.

      Implementing High-Quality Primary Care Through a Health Equity Lens

      The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) released a report on Implementing High-Quality Primary Care: Rebuilding the Foundation of Health Care, that provided a framework for defining high-quality primary care and proposed 5 recommendations for implementing that definition. Using the report’s framework, we identified health equity challenges and opportunities with examples from primary care systems in the United States and Canada. The time to transition those conversations to actionable items to improve the health of patients, families, and communities is now.

      Authors

      • Azza Eissa, MD, PhD, Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
      • Robyn Rowe, PhD, ICES Central, Strategic Partnerships & Digital Services, Indigenous Data Team, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
      • Andrew Pinto, MD, MSc, Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
      • George N. Okoli, MD, MSc, George and Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
      • Kendall M. Campbell, MD, Department of Family Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
      • Judy C. Washington, MD, Atlantic Medical Group, Overlook Family Medicine Residency Program, Summit, New Jersey
      • José E. Rodríguez, MD, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, Utah

      Eissa A, Rowe R, Pinto A, Okoli G, Campbell K, Washington J, Rodríguez J. Implementing High-Quality Primary Care Through a Health Equity Lens. Ann Fam Med 2022;20:Online. https://doi.org/10.1370/afm.2785.

      The Family Tree Spreads its Limbs: National Academy of Medicine Family Physician New Members 2021

      It is my pleasure to introduce you to and celebrate the accomplishments of Dr Erik Brodt and Dr Kendall Campbell, family physicians who have both been recently elected to the National Academy of Medicine. While this is a great honor for them, it is also an honor for our specialty, and we should recognize that both of these outstanding physicians identify as underrepresented in medicine! To help you get to know these amazing colleagues, I will share some interesting facts about their lives, as well as their internationally recognized work.

      Author

      • José E. Rodríguez, MD, FAAFP, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, UT, USA

      Rodríguez J. E. (2022). The Family Tree Spreads its Limbs: National Academy of Medicine Family Physician New Members 2021. Annals of family medicine, 20(1), 2–3. https://doi.org/10.1370/afm.2787

      Dismantling Anti-Black Racism in Medicine

      The murders of George Floyd and countless other members of the Black community by police prompted family medicine journals and professional societies to publish antiracism statements that provide actions, plans, and accountability structures to eliminate systemic anti-Black racism in medicine...Anti-Black racism is perpetuated by the limited compositional diversity of health systems, and racism happens in the absence of overtly racist people.

      Authors

      • José E. Rodríguez, MD, FAAFP, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, Utah
      • Kendall M. Campbell, MD FAAFP, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
      • Judy C. Washington, MD, FAAFP, Overlook Family Medicine Residency Program, Summit, New Jersey

      JE Rodríguez, KM Campbell, JC Washington. Am Fam Physician. 2021 Dec ;104(6):555-556.

      An Approach to Faculty Development for Underrepresented Minorities in Medicine

      The diversity of the US physician workforce lags significantly behind the population, and the disparities in academic medicine are even greater, with underrepresented in medicine (URM) physicians accounting for only 6.8% of all US medical school faculty. We describe a “for URM by URM” pilot approach to faculty development for junior URM Family Medicine physicians that targets unique challenges faced by URM faculty.

      Authors

      • Juan Robles, MD, Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
      • Tanya Anim, MD, Family Medicine Residency Program at Lee Health, Florida State University College of Medicine, Tallahassee, Florida
      • Maria Harsha Wusu, MD, MSEd, Department of Family Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia
      • Krys E. Foster, MD, MPH, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
      • Yury Parra, MD, Department of Family and Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York
      • Octavia Amaechi, MD, Spartanburg Regional Family Medicine Residency, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
      • Kari-Claudia Allen, MD, MPH, Palmetto Health-USC Family Medicine Residency Program, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina
      • Jose E. Rodríguez, MD, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City
      • Kendall M. Campbell, MD, Department of Family Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina
      • Dmitry Tumin, PhD, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina
      • Judy Washington, MD, Overlook Family Medicine Residency Program, Atlantic Health System, Summit, New Jersey

      Robles, J., Anim, T., Wusu, M. H., Foster, K. E., Parra, Y., Amaechi, O., Allen, K. C., Rodríguez, J. E., Campbell, K. M., Tumin, D., & Washington, J. (2021). An Approach to Faculty Development for Underrepresented Minorities in Medicine. Southern medical journal, 114(9), 579–582. https://doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000001290

      Addressing the Use of Teams in Primary Care

      Teams have been important in primary care for almost 15 years, and the recent National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) report, Implementing High-Quality Primary Care: Rebuilding the Foundation of Health Care, calls for the formation of diverse interprofessional teams that are well prepared and well supported to meet the primary care needs of their communities in the future. In addition, the report specifically recommends that teams be paid to care for people, that teams are trained where people live and work, and that teams are served by new information technology. In this issue of Annals of Family Medicine, we feature articles addressing these recommendations.

      Authors

      • José E. Rodríguez, MD, FAAFP, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
      • Therese Zink, MD, MPH, FAAFP, Department of Family Medicine & School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA

      JE Rodríguez, T Zink, Addressing the Use of Teams in Primary Care. Ann Fam Med 2021;19:386-387. https://doi.org/10.1370/afm.2741.

      Abolish the minority woman tax!

      In this issue of the Journal of Women's Health, Rodrigues Armijo et al. are to be commended on their excellent article on citizenship tasks for women physicians in academic medicine and the extra burden they shoulder for the sole privilege of being academic physicians. They have elucidated how citizenship tasks are unfairly distributed and coined a new addition to the literature—a “citizenship tax.” It is appalling, but it is the very tip of the iceberg.

      Authors

      • José E. Rodríguez, Office of Health Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
      • Maria Harsha Wusu, Family Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
      • Tanya Anim, Family Medicine Residency Program at Lee Health, College of Medicine, Florida State University, Ft. Myers, Florida, USA
      • Kari-Claudia Allen, Palmetto Health-USC Family Medicine Residency Program, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina, USA
      • Judy C. Washington, Family Medicine, Overlook Medical Center, Summit, New Jersey, USA

      JE Rodríguez, MH Wusu, T Anim, KC Allen, JC Washington, Abolish the Minority Woman Tax!.Journal of Women's Health.Jul 2021.914-915.http://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2020.8884

      Dear White People

      We are living in unprecedented times. While the world is grappling with COVID-19, we find the horrors of racism looming equally large as we, yet again, confront lurid deaths in the center of the news cycle of Black and brown people from police bias and brutality. Those of us who have been championing antiracism and justice work and bearing the burden of the “minority tax” have been overwhelmed by sudden asks from our well-intentioned White colleagues of how to best respond. In the tone of the Netflix series, “Dear White People,” we further emphasize that we are not alone in trying to reach out to you, our White colleagues and leaders. Please hear our story and heed our call to action.

      Authors

      • Krys E. Foster, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
      • Christina N. Johnson, Overlook Family Medicine Residency Program, Summit, New Jersey
      • Diana N. Carvajal, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
      • Cleveland Piggott, Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado
      • Kristin Reavis, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
      • Jennifer Y. C. Edgoose, Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin
      • Tricia C. Elliott, JPS Health Network, Fort Worth, Texas
      • Marji Gold, Department of Family and Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, New York
      • José E. Rodríguez, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, Utah
      • Judy C. Washington, Overlook Family Medicine Residency Program, Summit, New Jersey

      KE Foster, CN Johnson, DN Carvajal, C Piggott, K Reavis, JYC Edgoose, TC Elliott, M Gold, JE Rodríguez, JC Washington ...Dear White People. The Annals of Family Medicine January 2021, 19 (1) 66-69; DOI: https://doi.org/10.1370/afm.2634

      Maximizing Black applicant matriculation in US PA programs: associations between the number of submitted applications and likelihood of matriculation

      Physician Assistants (PA) are important members of the medical team, and increasing diversity in healthcare professionals has been consistently associated with improved health outcomes for underrepresented minority patients. In this study of a national cohort of PA program applicants, we investigated whether the number of programs a student applied to (Application Number, AN) was significantly associated with increased likelihood of matriculation into a PA program.

      Authors

      • Trenton Honda, Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA
      • Trenton D. Henry, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
      • Ellen D. Mandel, Physician Assistant Program, St. Elizabeth University, Morristown, NJ, USA
      • Alicia Quella, Department of Physician Assistant Studies, Augsburg University, Minneapolis, MN, USA
      • José E. Rodríguez, Office of the Associate Vice President for Health Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion, University of Utah Health, UT, Salt Lake City, USA
      • Shahpar Najmabadi, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
      • Virginia L. Valentin, Division of Physician Assistant Studies Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah, UT, Salt Lake City, USA

      Honda, T., Henry, T.D., Mandel, E.D. et al. Maximizing Black applicant matriculation in U.S. PA programs: associations between the number of submitted applications and likelihood of matriculation. BMC Med Educ 21, 127 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12909-021-02563-5

      Sharing the Power of White Privilege to Catalyze Positive Change in Academic Medicine

      White privilege can be often overlooked and poorly understood in academic medicine, by those who wield it, and by those who suffer from its deleterious effects. As our nation reckons with the murders of unarmed Black people by police, recognizing that many white people have been allies and agents of change forBlack and other minority people, discussing how the power of white privilege can be shared is needed. The authors discuss the power of white privilege and how that power can be shared to promote change in academic medicine.

      Authors

      • José E. Rodríguez, Office of the Associate Vice President for Health Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
      • Dmitry Tumin, Division of Academic Affairs, Department of Pediatrics, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA
      • Kendall M. Campbell, Research Group for Underrepresented Minorities in Academic Medicine, Brody School of Medicine, Division of Academic Affairs, East Carolina University, 600 Moye Blvd AD-47, Greenville, NC, 27834, USA

      Rodríguez, J.E., Tumin, D. & Campbell, K.M. Sharing the Power of White Privilege to Catalyze Positive Change in Academic Medicine. J. Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities 8, 539–542 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40615-020-00947-9

      Reverse Mentoring between Minority Students and Faculty

      Faculty from groups underrepresented in medicine, including Blacks, Latinx, American Indians, Alaska natives, and Pacific Islanders, experience a multitude of obstacles to entering and advancing in the field. At predominantly white institutions, u derrepresented facuty are often isolatedd from majority faculty and mainstream fulcture, feeling uncomfortable and out of place...

      Authors

      • Kendall M. Campbell, MD, Department of Family Medicine, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina
      • Michaela M. Braxton, MSW, Lenoir Country Health Department, Kinston, North Carolina
      • Dmitry Tumin, PhD, Department of Family Medicine and Department of Pediatrics, Brody School of Medicine, East Carollina University, Greenville, North Carolina
      • José E. Rodríguez, MD, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

      Campbell, K. M., Braxton, M. M., Tumin, D., & Rodríguez, J. E. (2020). Reverse Mentoring between Minority Students and Faculty. Journal of Best Practices in Health Professions Diversity, 13(2), 184–188. https://www.jstor.org/stable/27056500

      Minority Physicians Are Not Protected by Their White Coats

      We applaud the authors’ work in their brief report “Implicit Bias Training in a Residency Program: Aiming for Enduring Effects,” and their work to address bias on a systemic level. A priority of the study was to provide insight into how biases perpetuate institutional inequities, exacerbate structural racism, and the significant damage this causes. We wish to add that minority resident physicians are not protected by their white coats. They are also subjected to bias and discrimination from staff, patients, attendings, and colleagues. This has a direct, negative impact on patient care.

      Authors

      • Octavia Amaechi, MD, Spartanburg Regional Family Medicine Residency Program, Spartanburg, SC
      • José E. Rodríguez, MD, Office for Health Equity and Inclusion, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

      Amaechi O, Rodríguez JE. Minority Physicians Are Not Protected by Their White Coats. Fam Med. 2020;52(8):603-603. https://doi.org/10.22454/FamMed.2020.737963.