Academics & Research

UCEER

Mentored RAs

Tiffany A Campbell

Tiffany A Campbell

Title:  Graduate Research Assistant

Tiffany is a fourth-year doctoral candidate in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Utah. Her research centers on identifying deeply problematic, ableist conceptions of well-being within bioethics and medicine, derived from mistaken Aristotelian assumptions about "normal human functioning" and "flourishing," and how these conceptions might frame medical determinations about the sorts of lives that are valued when genetic variation is a consideration. She works under the guidance of Professor Leslie Francis.

Email:  tiffany.campbell@utah.edu

Phone:  801-581-8161

Hannah Mundinger

Hannah Mundinger

Title:  Undergraduate Research Assistant

Hannah Mundinger is a third-year undergraduate student at the University of Utah majoring in Psychology and Health, Society, and Policy with a minor in Anthropology.  Her research interests center on the social and structural mechanisms that augment or hinder communication in the context of rare diseases. She is currently working under the guidance of Professor Kaphingst and Mariah Wellman on how social media creation influences identity in relation to genetic disorders.  

Email:  hlmundinger@gmail.com

Audrey Pozernick

Audrey Pozernick

Title:  Undergraduate Research Assistant

Audrey Pozernick is a senior at the university of Utah double majoring in philosophy and political science. She is interested in criminal justice reform, and she is a racial justice advocate with the Black Lives Matter chapter in Utah. Lately, she has become interested in health and genetic research and how such topics influence the discussion around how society sees race and (dis)ability.

Email:  appozernick@gmail.com

Aubrey Mansfield

Aubrey Mansfield

Title:  Graduate Research Assistant

Aubrey is a graduate student at the University of Utah, working towards earning her master’s degree in recreational therapy. She also received her bachelor’s degree in recreational therapy from the University of Utah. Having a physical disability herself, Aubrey is very passionate about being an advocate for individuals who identify as having a disability. Her ultimate goal as a recreational therapist is to open a private practice where people who have physical disabilities can receive individualized recreational therapy services as well as other types of support for navigating life with a disability. As a UCEER research assistant, the current research project that Aubrey is working on focuses on Utah’s history of eugenics and the effects on groups that were primarily affected, one of those groups being people who had disabilities. Aubrey enjoys spending time with her family, creative writing, lacrosse, and keeping fit.

Email:  aubrey.anna6598@gmail.com

Zachary Ascherl

Zachary Ascherl

Title:  J.D. Candidate 2022

Zach is a 3rd-year student at S.J. Quinney College of Law. His research interests include the medicalization of criminal conduct, mental health therapy, and legal theory.  Zach received his undergraduate degree in Philosophy with a minor in Political Science from the University of Utah. His study focused on practical rationality and metaethics. His work experience includes litigation in property development and personal injury. Zach has interned with the Utah Court of Appeals and the Utah Office of the Guardian Ad Litem. He enjoys cooking, biking, yoga, and guitar.

Email:  Zachary.Ascherl@law.utah.edu

Douglas Shumway

Douglas Shumway

Doug is a third-year law student at the S.J. Quinney College of Law. He received a Bachelor of Science in Public Health and Epidemiology from Brigham Young University. While at BYU, Doug conducted research on the effects and correlation between inversion levels and cases of influenza. Doug then went on to receive a Master of Science in Biohazardous Threat Agents and Emerging Infectious Diseases from Georgetown University. While at Georgetown, Doug worked at the Center for Global Health Science and Security as a Research Assistant. There, Doug studied health security in Kenya, Uganda, and Vietnam. He is interested in bioethics and biosecurity. Doug enjoys spending time with his family, reading, cooking, and running.

Email:  douglasgshumway@gmail.com

Daniel Chavez-Yenter

Daniel Chavez-Yenter

Title:  PhD Student

Daniel is a third year PhD student in the Department of Communication at the University of Utah. He also serves as a Research Assistant for Huntsman Cancer Institute and The iNterdisciplinary EXchange for Utah Science. Daniel is interested in the communication of genetic testing (and genomics broadly) to underserved populations, in particular the Latinx community through integrating public health and communication scholarship together. With a better understanding of how genetic testing is communicated to Latinx populations can researchers and providers create more evidence-based and translational interventions to improve genomic engagement with these underrepresented groups. Daniel’s current research with UCEER explores mass media and social media communication of genetic testing with Spanish-speaking outlets and users to explore their potential impacts on intention to test or not. Prior to joining UCEER, Daniel served as a behavioral/clinical research and evaluation manager for a community-based organization in Jackson, Mississippi focused on HIV prevention, treatment and care efforts with the Black LGBTQI+ community. Daniel holds a Master’s of Public Health from the University of Michigan and a Bachelor’s of Science from Michigan State University.

Email:  Daniel.Chavez-Yenter@hci.utah.edu

Hannah Allen

Hannah Allen

Hannah is a third-year graduate student in the Philosophy Department at the University of Utah. Her current research with UCEER is with James Tabery; together, they are investigating the Stateville Penitentiary Malaria Studies. This infamous research project resulted in the discovery of the G6PD deficiency, a keystone in the foundation of pharmacogenetics. They seek to understand how race and notions of racial differences worked their way into the Stateville studies and how they subsequently shaped the pursuit of pharmacogenetics.

Email:  h.allen@utah.edu