Education

Center for Law and Biomedical Sciences

The center and its faculty and students are involved in applied, interdisciplinary research, innovative teaching and training and public service and programming. The center was provisionally established three years ago, and it has grown into a stand-alone center that has sponsored and supported a number of academic initiatives. The center has four full-time faculty members (including UCEER Research team members Leslie Francis and Teneille Brown), one part-time faculty member and 10 student fellows. It sponsors a number of courses for university students, including a health law course for non-lawyers to an interdisciplinary group of students in medicine, nursing, pharmacy and other health sciences.

 

Ethical, Legal and Social Issues track of the Graduate Certificate in Personalized Healthcare

The Program in Personalized Health Care has established a Graduate Certificate in Personalized Health Care, a first of its kind. The certificate harnesses many of the successful educational programs already established at the University of Utah to provide a foundational understanding of the many aspects of personalized health care (PHC). The Certificate is intended for current graduate students at the University of Utah looking to enhance their current training with personalized health care.

 

MDCRC 6150: Foundations in Personalized Health Care (Spring 2016)

Foundations in Personalized Health Care  is a survey course designed to introduce students to many facets of this emerging field. Sponsored by the University of Utah Program in Personalized Health Care and the Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS), the course is offered through the Master of Science in Clinical Investigation (MSCI) program. This course is open to students outside the MSCI program and can be approved as an elective in other degree programs. This course is an approved elective in the medical school curriculum (MD ID 7250). A Continuing Education section also is available. Faculty, staff and the public are welcome to attend the seminar portion of the course on a drop in basis.

 

UGS 2250: Undergraduate Medical Humanities BlockU Course

What's normal? Are  you  normal? Medicine traditionally draws a clear line between the healthy and the diseased, the able and the disabled, the normal and the abnormal. These traditional dichotomies are being challenged by science and culture. In the Medical Humanities BlockU we will discuss specific cases and embed them in larger questions about normalcy: What is normal and abnormal? And what do science and the humanities have to say about the matter? How can (or should) medicine intervene on the "abnormal"? And who decides on such interventions?

Gene Editing in Human Embryos: Values and Choices by Professor Jeffrey Botkin